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Acquired Angioedema Due to C1 Inhibitor Deficiency Differential Diagnoses

  • Author: Amanda T Moon, MD; Chief Editor: William D James, MD  more...
 
Updated: Mar 07, 2016
 
 

Diagnostic Considerations

Other disorders to consider in the diagnosis of acquired angioedema are ACE inhibitor–induced angioedema, episodic angioedema with angioedema, and cold urticaria.

Go to Angioedema, Pediatric Angioedema, Acute Angioedema, and Hereditary Angioedema for complete information on this topic.

Differential Diagnoses

 
 
Contributor Information and Disclosures
Author

Amanda T Moon, MD Resident Physician, Department of Dermatology, University of Rochester, Strong Memorial Hospital

Amanda T Moon, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Dermatology, American Medical Association, American Medical Student Association/Foundation, Society for Pediatric Dermatology

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Coauthor(s)

Warren R Heymann, MD Head, Division of Dermatology, Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School

Warren R Heymann, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Dermatology, American Society of Dermatopathology, Society for Investigative Dermatology

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Ru'aa Al Harithy, MBBS, FRCPC Clinical Fellow in Laser and Cosmetic Dermatology, Division of Dermatology, SunnyBrook Hospital, University of Toronto Faculty of Medicine, Canada

Ru'aa Al Harithy, MBBS, FRCPC is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Dermatology, Canadian Dermatology Association

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Chief Editor

William D James, MD Paul R Gross Professor of Dermatology, Vice-Chairman, Residency Program Director, Department of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

William D James, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Dermatology, Society for Investigative Dermatology

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Acknowledgements

Paul Krusinski, MD Director of Dermatology, Fletcher Allen Health Care; Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Vermont College of Medicine

Paul Krusinski, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Dermatology, American College of Physicians, and Society for Investigative Dermatology

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Kathleen M Rossy, MD Staff Physician, Department of Dermatology, New York Medical College, Metropolitan Hospital

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Robert A Schwartz, MD, MPH Professor and Head, Dermatology, Professor of Pathology, Pediatrics, Medicine, and Preventive Medicine and Community Health, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-New Jersey Medical School

Robert A Schwartz, MD, MPH is a member of the following medical societies: Alpha Omega Alpha, American Academy of Dermatology, American College of Physicians, and Sigma Xi

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Michael J Wells, MD Associate Professor, Department of Dermatology, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Paul L Foster School of Medicine

Michael J Wells, MD is a member of the following medical societies: Alpha Omega Alpha, American Academy of Dermatology, American Medical Association, and Texas Medical Association

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

References
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  15. Desai HG, Shah SS. Recurrent intestinal obstruction with acquired angio-oedema, due to C1-esterase inhibitor deficiency. J Assoc Physicians India. 2014 Jun. 62 (6):524-5. [Medline].

  16. Kaur R, Williams AA, Swift CB, Caldwell JW. Rituximab therapy in a patient with low grade B-cell lymphoproliferative disease and concomitant acquired angioedema. J Asthma Allergy. 2014. 7:165-7. [Medline].

  17. Dreyfus DH, Na CR, Randolph CC, Kearney D, Price C, Podell D. Successful rituximab B lymphocyte depletion therapy for angioedema due to acquired C1 inhibitor protein deficiency: association with reduced C1 inhibitor protein autoantibody titers. Isr Med Assoc J. 2014 May. 16 (5):315-6. [Medline].

  18. Rottem M, Mader R. Successful use of etanercept in acquired angioedema in a patient with psoriatic arthritis. J Rheumatol. 2010 Jan. 37(1):209. [Medline].

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Angioedema secondary to ACE inhibitors.
 
 
 
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