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Trichomycosis Pubis Clinical Presentation

  • Author: Vladimir O Osipov, MD; Chief Editor: Dirk M Elston, MD  more...
 
Updated: Sep 18, 2014
 

History

While many patients are asymptomatic, patients have presented because of pubic rash, foul odor, or growths on the pubic hair. Presenting complaints of colored sweat also have been recorded, resulting in a consideration of chromhidrosis.

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Physical

Patients typically present with yellow or red nodules on the hair shafts; yellow is most common. Sweat in the region tends to be colored similarly. Lesions present in the inguinal region, often on the scrotum but occasionally on the base of the shaft of the penis. Lesions can be associated with erythema and itching, and superinfection with dermatophytes has been noted.

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Causes

Risk factors appear to be geographic, with the highest incidence in tropic areas. In addition, poor hygiene often is present.

Other diagnostic considerations

Clinical separation from other organisms often is not performed, and treatment focuses on the empirical use of drying agents and topical antibiotics. Thus, the use of topical powders can be a confounding factor in diagnosis. True fungal infections (piedra) also may confound the diagnosis but may be present as superinfection. Piedra presents with nodularity of the hair shafts that is either tan to white (white piedra) or black (black piedra), as opposed to the yellow or red nodules of trichomycosis. White piedra may have a gelatinous appearance.

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Contributor Information and Disclosures
Author

Vladimir O Osipov, MD Pathologist In Charge, QML Townsville

Vladimir O Osipov, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Society for Clinical Pathology, United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology, Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia, College of American Pathologists

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Coauthor(s)

Milton W Datta, MD Assistant Professor, Departments of Pathology, Urology, and Hematology-Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine

Milton W Datta, MD is a member of the following medical societies: College of American Pathologists, United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Peter Langenstroer, MD Associate Professor, Department of Urology, Medical College of Wisconsin

Peter Langenstroer, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Urological Association

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Scott M Acker, MD Associate Professor, Director of Dermatopathology, Departments of Dermatology and Pathology, University of Alabama at Birmingham

Scott M Acker, MD is a member of the following medical societies: Alpha Omega Alpha, American Medical Association, American Society for Clinical Pathology, Southern Medical Association

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Specialty Editor Board

Michael J Wells, MD, FAAD Associate Professor, Department of Dermatology, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Paul L Foster School of Medicine

Michael J Wells, MD, FAAD is a member of the following medical societies: Alpha Omega Alpha, American Academy of Dermatology, American Medical Association, Texas Medical Association

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Lester F Libow, MD Dermatopathologist, South Texas Dermatopathology Laboratory

Lester F Libow, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Dermatology, American Society of Dermatopathology, Texas Medical Association

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Chief Editor

Dirk M Elston, MD Professor and Chairman, Department of Dermatology and Dermatologic Surgery, Medical University of South Carolina College of Medicine

Dirk M Elston, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Dermatology

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Additional Contributors

Daniel Mark Siegel, MD, MS Clinical Professor of Dermatology, Department of Dermatology, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center

Daniel Mark Siegel, MD, MS is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Dermatology, American College of Mohs Surgery, American Association for Physician Leadership, American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, American Society for MOHS Surgery, International Society for Dermatologic Surgery

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

References
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  12. Bargman H. Trichomycosis of the scrotal hair. Arch Dermatol. 1984 Mar. 120(3):299. [Medline].

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  14. Rosen T, Krawczynska AM, McBride ME, Ellner K. Naftifine treatment of trichomycosis pubis. Int J Dermatol. 1991 Sep. 30(9):667-9. [Medline].

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