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Trichomycosis Pubis Workup

  • Author: Vladimir O Osipov, MD; Chief Editor: Dirk M Elston, MD  more...
 
Updated: Sep 18, 2014
 

Laboratory Studies

Hair culture can be used to grow the anaerobic diphtheroids present as short gram-positive rods. These studies usually are not essential but may be used if no response to initial treatment occurs or targeted antibacterial treatment fails to result in a cure (and fungal superinfection should be eliminated).

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Histologic Findings

While usually not performed, in rare cases samples of the hair have been removed and sent for surgical pathology slide preparation. These cases document the presence of filamentous bacterial growth perpendicular to the hair shaft, present in a background of elaborated cement substance that makes up the concretions. The bacteria adhere to but do not penetrate the hair shaft. Superinfection with cocci or fungi also can be present.

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Contributor Information and Disclosures
Author

Vladimir O Osipov, MD Pathologist In Charge, QML Townsville

Vladimir O Osipov, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Society for Clinical Pathology, United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology, Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia, College of American Pathologists

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Coauthor(s)

Milton W Datta, MD Assistant Professor, Departments of Pathology, Urology, and Hematology-Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine

Milton W Datta, MD is a member of the following medical societies: College of American Pathologists, United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Peter Langenstroer, MD Associate Professor, Department of Urology, Medical College of Wisconsin

Peter Langenstroer, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Urological Association

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Scott M Acker, MD Associate Professor, Director of Dermatopathology, Departments of Dermatology and Pathology, University of Alabama at Birmingham

Scott M Acker, MD is a member of the following medical societies: Alpha Omega Alpha, American Medical Association, American Society for Clinical Pathology, Southern Medical Association

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Specialty Editor Board

Michael J Wells, MD, FAAD Associate Professor, Department of Dermatology, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Paul L Foster School of Medicine

Michael J Wells, MD, FAAD is a member of the following medical societies: Alpha Omega Alpha, American Academy of Dermatology, American Medical Association, Texas Medical Association

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Lester F Libow, MD Dermatopathologist, South Texas Dermatopathology Laboratory

Lester F Libow, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Dermatology, American Society of Dermatopathology, Texas Medical Association

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Chief Editor

Dirk M Elston, MD Professor and Chairman, Department of Dermatology and Dermatologic Surgery, Medical University of South Carolina College of Medicine

Dirk M Elston, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Dermatology

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Additional Contributors

Daniel Mark Siegel, MD, MS Clinical Professor of Dermatology, Department of Dermatology, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center

Daniel Mark Siegel, MD, MS is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Dermatology, American College of Mohs Surgery, American Association for Physician Leadership, American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, American Society for MOHS Surgery, International Society for Dermatologic Surgery

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

References
  1. Crissey JT, Rebell GC, Laskas JJ. Studies on the causative organism of trichomycosis axillaris. J Invest Dermatol. 1952 May. 19(3):187-97. [Medline].

  2. Freeman RG, McBride ME, Knox JM. Pathogenesis of trichomycosis axillaris. Arch Dermatol. 1969 Jul. 100(1):90-5. [Medline].

  3. McBride ME, Freeman RG, Knox JM. The bacteriology of trichomycosis axillaris. Br J Dermatol. 1968 Aug. 80(8):509-13. [Medline].

  4. Paxton FV. On a disease condition of the hairs of the axilla, probably of parasitic origin. J Cutan Med. 1869. 3:133.

  5. Savin JA, Somerville A, Noble WC. The bacterial flora of trichomycosis axillaris. J Med Microbiol. 1970 May. 3(2):352-6. [Medline].

  6. Montes L, Vasquez C, Cataldi M. Electron microscopic study of infected hairs in trichomycosis axillaris. J Invest Dermatol. 1963. 40:273-8.

  7. White SW, Smith J. Trichomycosis pubis. Arch Dermatol. 1979 Apr. 115(4):444-5. [Medline].

  8. Rho NK, Kim BJ. A corynebacterial triad: Prevalence of erythrasma and trichomycosis axillaris in soldiers with pitted keratolysis. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2008 Feb. 58(2 Suppl):S57-8. [Medline].

  9. Bonifaz A, Váquez-González D, Fierro L, Araiza J, Ponce RM. Trichomycosis (trichobacteriosis): clinical and microbiological experience with 56 cases. Int J Trichology. 2013 Jan. 5(1):12-6. [Medline]. [Full Text].

  10. Lestringant GG, Qayed KI, Fletcher S. Is the incidence of trichomycosis of genital hair underestimated?. J Am Acad Dermatol. 1991 Feb. 24(2 Pt 1):297-8. [Medline].

  11. Zaias N, Taplin D, Rebell GS. Final Report, Republic of Panama Medical Research. Washington, DC: Walter Reed Army Institute of Research; 1964.

  12. Bargman H. Trichomycosis of the scrotal hair. Arch Dermatol. 1984 Mar. 120(3):299. [Medline].

  13. Noble WC, Savin JA. Trichomycosis of the scrotal hair. Arch Dermatol. 1985 Jan. 121(1):25. [Medline].

  14. Rosen T, Krawczynska AM, McBride ME, Ellner K. Naftifine treatment of trichomycosis pubis. Int J Dermatol. 1991 Sep. 30(9):667-9. [Medline].

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