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Nevus Sebaceus Workup

  • Author: Anwar Al Hammadi, MD, FRCPC; Chief Editor: William D James, MD  more...
 
Updated: May 02, 2016
 

Histologic Findings

The epidermis shows papillomatous hyperplasia. In the dermis, the numbers of mature sebaceous glands are increased. Ectopic apocrine glands are often found in the deep dermis beneath sebaceous glands.

Frequently, small hair follicles and buds of basaloid cells that may represent malformed hair germs are present.

In childhood, the sebaceous glands in nevus sebaceus are underdeveloped, and the histologic findings may consist of only immature hair structures.

Note the images below:

Mild papillomatosis of the epidermis with sebaceusMild papillomatosis of the epidermis with sebaceus gland lobules opening directly onto the epidermis.
Mild papillomatosis at high power. Mild papillomatosis at high power.
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Staging

In the early stage, the sebaceous glands and hair follicles are hypoplastic. In the second stage, at puberty, hyperkeratosis and papillomatosis with numerous and hyperplastic sebaceous glands (diagnostic) are present.

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Contributor Information and Disclosures
Author

Anwar Al Hammadi, MD, FRCPC Consultant and Head of Dermatology, Rashid Hospital, Dubai Health Authority; Clinical Associate Professor of Dermatology, Dubai Medical College; Clinical Assistant Professor of Dermatology, University of Sharjah, UAE

Anwar Al Hammadi, MD, FRCPC is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Dermatology, Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, Canadian Dermatology Association, Skin Cancer Foundation

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Coauthor(s)

Mark G Lebwohl, MD Chairman, Department of Dermatology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine

Mark G Lebwohl, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Dermatology

Disclosure: Received none from Amgen for consultant & investigator; Received none from Novartis for consultant & investigator; Received none from Pfizer for consultant & investigator; Received none from Celgene Corporation for consultant & investigator; Received none from Clinuvel for consultant & investigator; Received none from Eli Lilly & Co. for consultant & investigator; Received none from Janssen Ortho Biotech for consultant & investigator; Received none from LEO Pharmaceuticals for consultant & inves.

Specialty Editor Board

David F Butler, MD Section Chief of Dermatology, Central Texas Veterans Healthcare System; Professor of Dermatology, Texas A&M University College of Medicine; Founding Chair, Department of Dermatology, Scott and White Clinic

David F Butler, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Medical Association, Alpha Omega Alpha, Association of Military Dermatologists, American Academy of Dermatology, American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, American Society for MOHS Surgery, Phi Beta Kappa

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Van Perry, MD Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine, Division of Dermatology, University of Texas School of Medicine at San Antonio

Van Perry, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Dermatology

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Chief Editor

William D James, MD Paul R Gross Professor of Dermatology, Vice-Chairman, Residency Program Director, Department of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

William D James, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Dermatology, Society for Investigative Dermatology

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Additional Contributors

Daniel Mark Siegel, MD, MS Clinical Professor of Dermatology, Department of Dermatology, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center

Daniel Mark Siegel, MD, MS is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Dermatology, American College of Mohs Surgery, American Association for Physician Leadership, American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, American Society for MOHS Surgery, International Society for Dermatologic Surgery

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

References
  1. Jaqueti G, Requena L, Sanchez Yus E. Trichoblastoma is the most common neoplasm developed in nevus sebaceus of Jadassohn: a clinicopathologic study of a series of 155 cases. Am J Dermatopathol. 2000 Apr. 22(2):108-18. [Medline].

  2. Warnke PH, Russo PA, Schimmelpenning GW, et al. Linear intraoral lesions in the sebaceous nevus syndrome. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2005 Feb. 52(2 Suppl 1):62-4. [Medline].

  3. Kavak A, Ozcelik D, Belenli O, Buyukbabani N, Saglam I, Lazova R. A unique location of naevus sebaceus: labia minora. J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2008 Sep. 22(9):1136-8. [Medline].

  4. Baykal C, Buyukbabani N, Yazganoglu KD, Saglik E. [Tumors associated with nevus sebaceous]. J Dtsch Dermatol Ges. 2006 Jan. 4(1):28-31. [Medline].

  5. Cribier B, Scrivener Y, Grosshans E. Tumors arising in nevus sebaceus: A study of 596 cases. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2000 Feb. 42(2 Pt 1):263-8. [Medline].

  6. Correale D, Ringpfeil F, Rogers M. Large, papillomatous, pedunculated nevus sebaceus: a new phenotype. Pediatr Dermatol. 2008 May-Jun. 25(3):355-8. [Medline].

  7. Rodins K, Baillie L. Hybrid follicular cyst (pilomatrical and infundibular) arising within a sebaceous nevus. Pediatr Dermatol. 2012 Mar-Apr. 29(2):213-6. [Medline].

  8. Ivker R, Resnick SD, Skidmore RA. Hypophosphatemic vitamin D-resistant rickets, precocious puberty, and the epidermal nevus syndrome. Arch Dermatol. 1997 Dec. 133(12):1557-61. [Medline].

  9. Fearfield LA, Bunker CB. Familial naevus sebaceous of Jadassohn. Br J Dermatol. 1998 Dec. 139(6):1119-20. [Medline].

  10. Happle R, Konig A. Familial naevus sebaceus may be explained by paradominant transmission. Br J Dermatol. 1999 Aug. 141(2):377. [Medline].

  11. Sahl WJ Jr. Familial nevus sebaceus of Jadassohn: occurrence in three generations. J Am Acad Dermatol. 1990 May. 22(5 Pt 1):853-4. [Medline].

  12. Paller A, Mancini A, eds. Tumors of epidermal appendages. Hurwitz Clinical Pediatric Dermatology. 3rd ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier Saunders; 2006. 221-2.

  13. Barkham MC, White N, Brundler MA, Richard B, Moss C. Should naevus sebaceus be excised prophylactically? A clinical audit. J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg. 2007. 60(11):1269-70. [Medline].

  14. Idriss MH, Elston DM. Secondary neoplasms associated with nevus sebaceus of Jadassohn: a study of 707 cases. J Am Acad Dermatol. Feb2014. 70(2):332-7. [Medline].

  15. Odom RB, James WD, Berger TG. Sebaceus nevi and tumors. Andrews' Diseases of the Skin. 9th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: WB Saunders; 2000. 845-46.

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Nevus sebaceus in a 4-month-old baby manifesting as nodular plaque.
Brownish wartlike plaque in a 25-year-old patient.
Nevus sebaceus manifesting as a bald patch in a child.
Nevus sebaceus manifesting as an orange-yellow plaque with a smooth or somewhat velvety surface in a 6-month-old baby.
Nevus sebaceus manifesting as a small plaque beside a scaly scalp in a 13-year-old boy.
Linear type of nevus sebaceus.
Mild papillomatosis of the epidermis with sebaceus gland lobules opening directly onto the epidermis.
Mild papillomatosis at high power.
Verrucous plaque in a 19-year-old woman.
Verrucous plaque in a 12-year-old-girl.
 
 
 
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