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Stucco Keratosis Clinical Presentation

  • Author: Raymond T Kuwahara, MD, MBA; Chief Editor: Dirk M Elston, MD  more...
 
Updated: Apr 29, 2014
 

History

See the list below:

  • Stucco keratosis is a benign lesion that is best regarded as a form of seborrheic keratosis.
  • Stucco keratosis lesions are often seen in elderly men.
  • The stucco keratosis lesions are asymptomatic and usually go unnoticed by both the patient and the clinician.
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Physical

See the list below:

  • Stucco keratosis lesions appear as keratotic papules or plaques on the lower extremities but are sometimes found on the upper extremities, usually acrally. Note the image below.
  • If the lesion is removed by curetting, a peripheral collarette of scale is sometimes left.
    Stucco keratosis in a 70-year-old male veteran. A Stucco keratosis in a 70-year-old male veteran. A few scattered white plaques are on the lower extremity.
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Causes

See the list below:

  • No known cause of stucco keratosis has been reported.
  • The epidermis is hyperplastic and usually exophytic with no dysplasia. This is similar to what is seen in seborrheic keratosis.
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Contributor Information and Disclosures
Author

Raymond T Kuwahara, MD, MBA Dermatologist

Raymond T Kuwahara, MD, MBA is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Dermatology

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Specialty Editor Board

Richard P Vinson, MD Assistant Clinical Professor, Department of Dermatology, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Paul L Foster School of Medicine; Consulting Staff, Mountain View Dermatology, PA

Richard P Vinson, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Dermatology, Texas Medical Association, Association of Military Dermatologists, Texas Dermatological Society

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Warren R Heymann, MD Head, Division of Dermatology, Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School

Warren R Heymann, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Dermatology, American Society of Dermatopathology, Society for Investigative Dermatology

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Chief Editor

Dirk M Elston, MD Professor and Chairman, Department of Dermatology and Dermatologic Surgery, Medical University of South Carolina College of Medicine

Dirk M Elston, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Dermatology

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Acknowledgements

Ron Rasberry, MD Associate Professor, Department of Dermatology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Medicine; Chief of Dermatology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center at Memphis

Ron Rasberry, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Dermatology, American Medical Association, American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Arkansas Medical Society, Association of Military Surgeons of the US, Royal Society of Medicine, and Southern Medical Association

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

References
  1. Kocsard E, Carter JJ. The papillomatous keratoses. The nature and differential diagnosis of stucco keratosis. Australas J Dermatol. 1971 Aug. 12(2):80-8. [Medline].

  2. Willoughby C, Soter NA. Stucco keratosis. Arch Dermatol. 1972 Jun. 105(6):859-61. [Medline].

  3. Stockfleth E, Rowert J, Arndt R, Christophers E, Meyer T. Detection of human papillomavirus and response to topical 5% imiquimod in a case of stucco keratosis. Br J Dermatol. 2000 Oct. 143(4):846-50. [Medline].

  4. Waisman M. Verruciform manifestations of keratosis follicularis: including a reappraisal of hard nevi (Unna). Arch Dermatol. 1960. 81:1-15.

  5. Hafner C, Landthaler M, Mentzel T, Vogt T. FGFR3 and PIK3CA mutations in stucco keratosis and dermatosis papulosa nigra. Br J Dermatol. 2010 Mar. 162(3):508-12. [Medline].

  6. Kirkham N. Tumors and cysts of the epidermis. Lever's Histopathology of the Skin. Philadelphia, Pa: WB Saunders; 1997. 693.

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Stucco keratosis in a 70-year-old male veteran. A few scattered white plaques are on the lower extremity.
Photomicrograph of characteristic church spires of stucco keratosis.
 
 
 
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