Acute Hemorrhagic Edema of Infancy Treatment & Management

Updated: May 02, 2016
  • Author: Donald Shenenberger, MD, FAAD, FAAFP; Chief Editor: William D James, MD  more...
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Treatment

Medical Care

No effective therapy exists for acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy (AHEI). The use of steroids and antihistamines has been controversial, and they do not appear to alter the disease course. However, systemic corticosteroids may be used to ameliorate the acute manifestations of the disease. [27] Treatment is symptomatic; discontinue antibiotics after obtaining negative culture results.

Inpatient care is not usually required unless the diagnosis of acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy (AHEI) is in doubt. If meningococcemia or another significant condition remains in the differential diagnosis, patients may require monitoring or therapy as appropriate for those disorders.

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Consultations

Consult a dermatologist if the diagnosis of acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy (AHEI) is in doubt. Additionally, consult a gastroenterologist or nephrologist if significant abdominal symptoms or renal involvement is noted.

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Diet

Acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy (AHEI) patients usually are nontoxic in appearance. Although visceral involvement is rare, maintain a relatively bland diet with plenty of fluids to maintain hydration.

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Activity

No particular restrictions in activity are required for acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy (AHEI).

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Complications

Rare reports have described complications such as arthritis, nephritis, [19, 20] abdominal pain, gastrointestinal tract bleeding, intussusception, [21] scrotal pain, compartment syndrome, [28] and testicular torsion. [22]

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Prevention

No known method exists for preventing acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy (AHEI) or recurrences of the condition.

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Long-Term Monitoring

Treatment for acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy (AHEI) is symptomatic. Monitor patients for abdominal or renal involvement, which, although rare, has been reported.

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