Pseudoatrophoderma Colli

Updated: Dec 12, 2016
  • Author: Anna Choczaj-Kukula, MD, PhD; Chief Editor: Dirk M Elston, MD  more...
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Overview

Background

Pseudoatrophoderma colli is an unusual persistent dermatosis characterized by the presence of pigmented macules and plaques with a wrinkled atrophic appearance, involving the neck and the upper part of the trunk.

Becker and Muir [1] reported the first case of pseudoatrophoderma colli in 1934. Since then, only single cases of this condition have been described; however, pseudoatrophoderma colli is likely more common than has been reported. [2, 3]

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Pathophysiology

The nature of the disease remains uncertain. Some authors suggest that vitamin A deficiency may be a contributing factor to the cause of this condition. In the past, pseudoatrophoderma colli was considered a subvariety or a transitional form of confluent and reticulate papillomatosis of Gougerot and Carteaud, [4, 5] or a variant of parapsoriasis. Reports of familial cases of pseudoatrophoderma colli support the theory that it is an autosomal dominant dermatosis and a single disease entity. [6, 7]

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Epidemiology

Frequency

Pseudoatrophoderma colli is rare, with only 10-20 cases reported.

Race

No clear racial predilection is described.

Sex

All patients described in the literature, except one, [8] are females.

Age

The reported cases of pseudoatrophoderma colli are in patients aged 14-45 years.

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Prognosis

Pseudoatrophoderma colli is a benign disease with no associated mortality or morbidity. The disease tends to spread gradually with partial regression and intervals, persisting for years or decades. Spontaneous clearing was reported in one patient.

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