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Asymmetric Periflexural Exanthem of Childhood Treatment & Management

  • Author: Patricia T Ting, MD, MSc, FRCPC, LMCC(Canada); Chief Editor: Dirk M Elston, MD  more...
 
Updated: May 13, 2016
 

Medical Care

No specific medical treatment is required for asymmetric periflexural exanthem of childhood (APEC). Low-potency topical steroids may be used, though a minimal response is expected. Hydroxyzine may be used to alleviate pruritus. The use of moisturizers may be recommended to manage pruritus and fine scaling.

 
 
Contributor Information and Disclosures
Author

Patricia T Ting, MD, MSc, FRCPC, LMCC(Canada) Clinical Assistant Professor, University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine, Canada

Patricia T Ting, MD, MSc, FRCPC, LMCC(Canada) is a member of the following medical societies: Alberta Medical Association, American Academy of Dermatology, American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Canadian Medical Association, Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, Canadian Dermatology Association

Disclosure: Serve(d) as a director, officer, partner, employee, advisor, consultant or trustee for: Galderma; Janssen Inc.<br/>Received income in an amount equal to or greater than $250 from: Galderma; Janssen Inc.

Specialty Editor Board

David F Butler, MD Section Chief of Dermatology, Central Texas Veterans Healthcare System; Professor of Dermatology, Texas A&M University College of Medicine; Founding Chair, Department of Dermatology, Scott and White Clinic

David F Butler, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Medical Association, Alpha Omega Alpha, Association of Military Dermatologists, American Academy of Dermatology, American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, American Society for MOHS Surgery, Phi Beta Kappa

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Robert A Schwartz, MD, MPH Professor and Head of Dermatology, Professor of Pathology, Pediatrics, Medicine, and Preventive Medicine and Community Health, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School; Visiting Professor, Rutgers University School of Public Affairs and Administration

Robert A Schwartz, MD, MPH is a member of the following medical societies: Alpha Omega Alpha, New York Academy of Medicine, American Academy of Dermatology, American College of Physicians, Sigma Xi

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Chief Editor

Dirk M Elston, MD Professor and Chairman, Department of Dermatology and Dermatologic Surgery, Medical University of South Carolina College of Medicine

Dirk M Elston, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Dermatology

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Additional Contributors

Timothy McCalmont, MD Director, UCSF Dermatopathology Service, Professor of Clinical Pathology and Dermatology, Departments of Pathology and Dermatology, University of California at San Francisco; Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Cutaneous Pathology

Timothy McCalmont, MD is a member of the following medical societies: Alpha Omega Alpha, American Medical Association, American Society of Dermatopathology, California Medical Association, College of American Pathologists, United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology

Disclosure: Received consulting fee from Apsara for independent contractor.

References
  1. Brunner MJ, Rubin L, Dunlap F. A new papular erythema of childhood. Arch Dermatol. 1962 Apr. 85:539-40. [Medline].

  2. Bodemer C, de Prost Y. Unilateral laterothoracic exanthem in children: a new disease?. J Am Acad Dermatol. 1992 Nov. 27(5 Pt 1):693-6. [Medline].

  3. Taieb A, Megraud F, Legrain V, Mortureux P, Maleville J. Asymmetric periflexural exanthem of childhood. J Am Acad Dermatol. 1993 Sep. 29(3):391-3. [Medline].

  4. Arun B, Salim A. Transient linear eruption: asymmetric periflexural exanthem or blaschkitis. Pediatr Dermatol. 2010 May-Jun. 27(3):301-2. [Medline].

  5. Bauza A, Redondo P, Fernandez J. Asymmetric periflexural exanthem in adults. Br J Dermatol. 2000 Jul. 143(1):224-6. [Medline].

  6. Chan PK, To KF, Zawar V, Lee A, Chuh AA. Asymmetric periflexural exanthem in an adult. Clin Exp Dermatol. 2004 May. 29(3):320-1. [Medline].

  7. Corazza M, Virgili A. Asymmetric periflexural exanthem in an adult. Acta Derm Venereol. 1997 Jan. 77(1):79-80. [Medline].

  8. Auvin S, Imiela A, Cuvellier JC, Catteau B, Vallee L, Martinot A. Asymmetric periflexural exanthem of childhood in a child with axonal Guillain-Barre syndrome. Br J Dermatol. 2004 Feb. 150(2):396-7. [Medline].

  9. Guimera-Martin-Neda F, Fagundo E, Rodriguez F, et al. Asymmetric periflexural exanthem of childhood: report of two cases with parvovirus B19. J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2006 Apr. 20(4):461-2. [Medline].

  10. Harangi F, Varszegi D, Szucs G. Asymmetric periflexural exanthem of childhood and viral examinations. Pediatr Dermatol. 1995 Jun. 12(2):112-5. [Medline].

  11. Pauluzzi P, Festini G, Gelmetti C. Asymmetric periflexural exanthem of childhood in an adult patient with parvovirus B19. J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2001 Jul. 15(4):372-4. [Medline].

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Morbilliformlike eruption in a child with involvement of the axilla, lateral thorax, and abdomen. Used with permission from McCuaig et al (1996) from the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.
Eczematouslike eruption with a predominantly hemicorporeal distribution photographed on the eighth day after initial appearance of lesions. Used with permission from Bodemer and de Prost (1992) from the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.
Pattern of reticulated plaques on the posterior lower limb of a child. Used with permission from McCuaig et al (1996) from the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.
Histopathologic slide demonstrates perivascular, interstitial, and periadnexal infiltrate of lymphocytes and histiocytes in the deep dermis (hematoxylin-phloxine-saffron stain). Used with permission from McCuaig et al (1996) from the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.
Histopathologic slide demonstrates epidermal spongiosis and lymphocytic infiltration of the intraepidermal portion of an eccrine duct (hematoxylin-phloxine-saffron stain). Used with permission from McCuaig et al (1996) from the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.
 
 
 
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