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Berloque Dermatitis Medication

  • Author: Ali Alikhan, MD; Chief Editor: William D James, MD  more...
 
Updated: Mar 04, 2016
 

Medication Summary

Medical therapy is largely unnecessary for the treatment of berloque dermatitis, except in cases with persistent hyperpigmentation. In these cases, skin-bleaching agents (eg, hydroquinone) are the mainstays of therapy.

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Depigmenting agents

Class Summary

Skin bleaching agents are indicated for the gradual depigmentation of hyperpigmented skin conditions.

Hydroquinone (Claripel cream with sunscreens)

 

Hydroquinone produces reversible depigmentation of the skin by inhibiting enzymatic oxidation of tyrosine to 3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-alanine (dopa)) and suppression of other melanocyte metabolic processes. Exposure to sunlight or ultraviolet light causes repigmentation, which may be prevented by the broad-spectrum sunscreen agents contained in this product.

Hydroquinone (Eldopaque-Forte, Solaquin Forte, Lustra)

 

Hydroquinone is indicated for the gradual bleaching of hyperpigmented skin conditions such as chloasma, melasma, freckles, senile lentigines, and other unwanted areas of melanin hyperpigmentation. It is also is used to reduce hyperpigmentation caused by photosensitization associated with inflammation or with the use of certain perfumes (berloque dermatitis).

Topical application of hydroquinone produces a reversible depigmentation of the skin by inhibition of the enzymatic oxidation of tyrosine to 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (dopa) and suppression of other melanocyte metabolic processes. Depigmentation may take 1-4 months to occur while existing melanin is sloughed off and excretion of new melanin is increased by hydroquinone. Exposure to sunlight or ultraviolet light will cause repigmentation, which may be prevented by broad-spectrum sunscreen agents.

Hydroquinone is available topically, in strengths of 2-4%, in the form of a cream, lotion, solution, powder, or gel.

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Contributor Information and Disclosures
Author

Ali Alikhan, MD Clinical Assistant Professor, Director of Clinical Trials, Residency Program Co-Director, Department of Dermatology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

Ali Alikhan, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Dermatology, National Psoriasis Foundation, Cincinnati Dermatological Society, National Psoriasis Foundation, Ohio Dermatological Association

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Coauthor(s)

Ai-Lean Chew, MBChB, MRCP Honorary Consultant, St John's Institute of Dermatology, Guy's and St Thomas' Hospital NHS Trust, UK and Locum Consultant, South London Healthcare NHS Trust, UK

Ai-Lean Chew, MBChB, MRCP is a member of the following medical societies: British Medical Association, Royal Society of Medicine, British Association of Dermatologists

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Howard I Maibach, MD Professor and Vice Chairperson, Department of Dermatology, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine; Consulting Staff, University of California Hospitals

Howard I Maibach, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Dermatology, American College of Forensic Examiners Institute, Pacific Dermatologic Association, American Contact Dermatitis Society, American Federation for Clinical Research, American College of Physicians, American Medical Association, California Medical Association, Society for Investigative Dermatology

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Specialty Editor Board

David F Butler, MD Section Chief of Dermatology, Central Texas Veterans Healthcare System; Professor of Dermatology, Texas A&M University College of Medicine; Founding Chair, Department of Dermatology, Scott and White Clinic

David F Butler, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Medical Association, Alpha Omega Alpha, Association of Military Dermatologists, American Academy of Dermatology, American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, American Society for MOHS Surgery, Phi Beta Kappa

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Edward F Chan, MD Clinical Assistant Professor, Department of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Edward F Chan, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Dermatology, American Society of Dermatopathology, Society for Investigative Dermatology

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Chief Editor

William D James, MD Paul R Gross Professor of Dermatology, Vice-Chairman, Residency Program Director, Department of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

William D James, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Dermatology, Society for Investigative Dermatology

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Additional Contributors

Marjan Garmyn, MD, PhD Professor, Faculty of Medicine, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium; Chair and Adjunct Head, Department of Dermatology, University of Leuven, Belgium

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

References
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