Phacomorphic Glaucoma

Updated: May 31, 2016
  • Author: Harpreet Gill, MD; Chief Editor: Hampton Roy, Sr, MD  more...
  • Print
Overview

Background

Phacomorphic glaucoma is the term used for secondary angle-closure glaucoma due to lens intumescence. The increase in lens thickness from an advanced cataract, a rapidly intumescent lens, or a traumatic cataract can lead to pupillary block and angle closure.

Phacomorphic glaucoma is shown in the image below.

Phacomorphic glaucoma. Phacomorphic glaucoma.
Next:

Pathophysiology

In an eye with advanced cataract formation, the lens is swollen or intumescent. Progressive reduction occurs in the iridocorneal angle. In such eyes, pupillary block glaucoma is caused by changes in the size of the lens and the position of the anterior lens surface. Angle closure may be secondary to an enhanced pupillary block mechanism, or it may be due to forward displacement of the lens-iris diaphragm.

Previous
Next:

Epidemiology

Frequency

International

Although no formal epidemiologic statistics are available, angle closure from hypermature cataracts is more common in countries where cataracts are common and surgery is not readily available.

Race

Phacomorphic glaucoma can occur in any race.

Sex

Phacomorphic glaucoma occurs equally in men and women.

Age

Generally, phacomorphic glaucoma is observed in older patients with senile cataracts, but it can occur in younger patients after a traumatic cataract or a rapidly developing intumescent cataract.

Previous