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Dacryoadenitis Follow-up

  • Author: Gagan J Singh, MD; Chief Editor: Hampton Roy, Sr, MD  more...
 
Updated: Mar 09, 2015
 

Further Outpatient Care

Acute dacryoadenitis: For most patients, 2-6 weeks of follow-up care on an outpatient basis is necessary after beginning the initial treatment.

Chronic dacryoadenitis: Patient should receive follow-up care, in conjunction with the primary care physician, on an outpatient basis.

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Prognosis

Acute dacryoadenitis: Prognosis is good. Acute dacryoadenitis is a self-limiting condition in most instances.

Chronic dacryoadenitis: Prognosis is dependent on the management of the associated chronic systemic condition.

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Contributor Information and Disclosures
Author

Gagan J Singh, MD Chief of Ophthalmology, GMS Medical Eye Center, LLC; Clinical Assistant Professor, Department of Ophthalmology, West Virginia University School of Medicine

Gagan J Singh, MD is a member of the following medical societies: Alpha Omega Alpha, American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery, American Academy of Ophthalmology

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Coauthor(s)

Richard Ahuja, MD Clinical Instructor, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Maryland Medical School

Richard Ahuja, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Ophthalmology, American Medical Association

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Specialty Editor Board

Simon K Law, MD, PharmD Clinical Professor of Health Sciences, Department of Ophthalmology, Jules Stein Eye Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine

Simon K Law, MD, PharmD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Ophthalmology, Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, American Glaucoma Society

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Chief Editor

Hampton Roy, Sr, MD Associate Clinical Professor, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

Hampton Roy, Sr, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Ophthalmology, American College of Surgeons, Pan-American Association of Ophthalmology

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Additional Contributors

Ron W Pelton, MD, PhD Private Practice, Colorado Springs, Colorado

Ron W Pelton, MD, PhD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Ophthalmology, American College of Surgeons, AO Foundation, American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Colorado Medical Society

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

References
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  2. Nieto JC, Kim N, Lucarelli MJ. Dacryoadenitis and orbital myositis associated with lyme disease. Arch Ophthalmol. 2008 Aug. 126(8):1165-6. [Medline].

  3. Kamao T, Miyazaki T, Soga Y, et al. Genetic dissociation of dacryoadenitis and sialadenitis in a Sjogren's syndrome mouse model with common and different susceptibility gene loci. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2009 Feb 14. [Medline].

  4. Boruchoff SA, Boruchoff SE. Infections of the lacrimal system. Infect Dis Clin North Am. 1992 Dec. 6(4):925-32. [Medline].

  5. Brindley GO. Dacryoadenitis. Oculoplastic and Orbital Emergencies. Appleton & Lange: 1990. 45-50.

  6. Fitzsimmons TD, Wilson SE, Kennedy RH. Infectious dacryoadenitis. Ocular Infection and Immunity. St Louis, Mo: Mosby; 1996. 1341-45.

  7. Jakobiec FA, Yeo JH, Trokel SL, et al. Combined clinical and computed tomographic diagnosis of primary lacrimal fossa lesions. Am J Ophthalmol. 1982 Dec. 94(6):785-807. [Medline].

  8. Massaro BM, Tabbara KF. Infections of lacrimal apparatus. Infections of the Eye. Boston: Little Brown; 1996. 551-8.

  9. Podos SM, Yanoff M. Acute dacryoadenitis. Textbook of Ophthalmology - External Disease. Europe: Mosby-Year Book; 1994. 1414-6.

  10. Rhem MN, Wilhelmus KR, Jones DB. Epstein-Barr virus dacryoadenitis. Am J Ophthalmol. 2000 Mar. 129(3):372-5. [Medline].

  11. Tomita M, Shimmura S, Tsubota K, Shimazaki J. Dacryoadenitis associated with Acanthamoeba keratitis. Arch Ophthalmol. 2006 Sep. 124(9):1239-42. [Medline].

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