Close
New

Medscape is available in 5 Language Editions – Choose your Edition here.

 

Distichiasis Follow-up

  • Author: Soheila Rostami, MD, FAACC; Chief Editor: Hampton Roy, Sr, MD  more...
 
Updated: Oct 14, 2015
 

Complications

In some cases, differentiation of acquired distichiasis from trichiasis may be difficult. In trichiasis, the lashes grow from the anterior lamella, not from the meibomian orifices (see following image). After lid reconstruction, this distinction may not be possible, especially if a skin graft was used.

This picture demonstrates distichiasis of the loweThis picture demonstrates distichiasis of the lower lid. From Principles and Practice of Ophthalmology by Jakobiec.

Entropion may be confused with distichiasis. The lids must be held in their proper position to evaluate the lashes. Careful examination of the lid anatomy and the lid position prevents the misdiagnosis.

Epiblepharon is a condition that is mostly present in children. In this condition, the lashes are not truly misdirected, but pushed by the fold of pretarsal skin against the globe.

Lid scar, chronic blepharoconjunctivitis, and cicatricial conjunctivitis are other conditions that can be confused with distichiasis.

Complications of surgical interventions are hemorrhage, infection, wound dehiscence, lid margin deformities, entropion or ectropion, and regrowth.

 
Contributor Information and Disclosures
Author

Soheila Rostami, MD, FAACC Director, Rostami Ophthalmic Plastic Consultants

Soheila Rostami, MD, FAACC is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Ophthalmology, American Medical Association

Disclosure: Serve(d) as a speaker or a member of a speakers bureau for: Eclipse, Galderma, Mertz.

Specialty Editor Board

Simon K Law, MD, PharmD Clinical Professor of Health Sciences, Department of Ophthalmology, Jules Stein Eye Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine

Simon K Law, MD, PharmD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Ophthalmology, Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, American Glaucoma Society

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Chief Editor

Hampton Roy, Sr, MD Associate Clinical Professor, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

Hampton Roy, Sr, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Ophthalmology, American College of Surgeons, Pan-American Association of Ophthalmology

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

References
  1. Allen RC. Genetic diseases affecting the eyelids: what should a clinician know?. Curr Opin Ophthalmol. 2013 Sep. 24(5):463-77. [Medline].

  2. Butler MG, Dagenais SL, Garcia-Perez JL, Brouillard P, Vikkula M, Strouse P, et al. Microcephaly, intellectual impairment, bilateral vesicoureteral reflux, distichiasis, and glomuvenous malformations associated with a 16q24.3 contiguous gene deletion and a Glomulin mutation. Am J Med Genet A. 2012 Apr. 158A(4):839-49. [Medline]. [Full Text].

  3. Moosavi AH, Mollan SP, Berry-Brincat A, et al. Simple surgery for severe trichiasis. Ophthal Plast Reconstr Surg. 2007 Jul-Aug. 23(4):296-7. [Medline].

  4. Pham RT. Treat of trichiasis using 810 nm diode laser: an efficacy study. Paper presented at: Annual Meeting of the American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery; New Orleans, La. October 22-23, 2004.

  5. McCracken MS, Kikkawa DO, Vasani SN. Treatment of trichiasis and distichiasis by eyelash trephination. Ophthal Plast Reconstr Surg. 2006 Sep-Oct. 22(5):349-51. [Medline].

  6. Anderson RL. Surgical repair for distichiasis. Arch Ophthalmol. 1977 Jan. 95(1):169. [Medline].

  7. Bosniak S. Principles and Practice of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. WB Saunders Co; 1996. Vol 1: 409.

  8. Dortzbach RK. Ophthalmic Plastic Surgery: Prevention and Management of Complications. Lippincott-Raven Publishers; 1994. 42-8.

  9. Fein W. Surgical repair for distichiasis, trichiasis, and entropion. Arch Ophthalmol. 1976 May. 94(5):809-10. [Medline].

  10. Hill JC. Trichiasis and distichiasis. Can J Ophthalmol. 1976 Oct. 11(4):353-4. [Medline].

  11. Pham RT, Biesman BS, Silkiss RZ. Treatment of trichiasis using an 810-nm diode laser: an efficacy study. Ophthal Plast Reconstr Surg. 2006 Nov-Dec. 22(6):445-7. [Medline].

  12. Scheie HG, Albert DM. Distichiasis and trichiasis: origin and management. Am J Ophthalmol. 1966 Apr. 61(4):718-20. [Medline].

Previous
Next
 
This picture demonstrates distichiasis of the lower lid. From Principles and Practice of Ophthalmology by Jakobiec.
This picture demonstrates distichiasis of the upper lid. From Ophthalmic Plastic Surgery: Prevention and Management of Complications by Dortzbach.
This picture demonstrates the cryotherapy of the lower lid with distichiasis. From Ophthalmic Plastic Surgery: Prevention and Management of Complications by Dortzbach.
 
 
 
All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2016 by WebMD LLC. This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.