Intraocular Foreign Body Clinical Presentation

  • Author: Ferenc Kuhn, MD, PhD; Chief Editor: Hampton Roy, Sr, MD  more...
 
Updated: Mar 17, 2015
 

History

A few direct questions should be sufficient for the ophthalmologist to suspect the presence of an IOFB in eyes with an open globe injury.

In case of doubt, it is advisable to err on the side of an IOFB presence. The most common cause for litigation against the ophthalmologist in a trauma case is a missed IOFB. It is important to remember that the patient may be unaware of any object entering (or even striking) the eye, and the vision may be unaffected initially.

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Physical

A complete examination of both eyes is necessary, including the visual acuity.

A corneal entry wound and a hole in the iris provide trajectory information.

The slit lamp is extremely useful in detailing all anterior segment pathologies.[5]

The indirect ophthalmoscope through a dilated pupil may allow direct visualization of the IOFB, which gives the most useful information for the surgeon.

Gonioscopy and scleral depression are not recommended unless the entry wound has been surgically closed.

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Causes

Hammering and using power tools are the most important causes. Protective eyewear, if appropriate (3 mm of polycarbonate), prevents virtually all injuries.

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Contributor Information and Disclosures
Author

Ferenc Kuhn, MD, PhD Associate Professor of Clinical Ophthalmology, University of Alabama at Birmingham; Consulting Staff, American Society of Ocular Trauma, Helen Keller Foundation for Research and Education, Chief Vitreoretinal Surgeon, Milos Klinika, Belgrade, Serbia

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Coauthor(s)

David T Wong, MD, FRCSC Associate Professor of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, University of Toronto Faculty of Medicine; Ophthalmologist-in-Chief, St Michael's Hospital, Canada

David T Wong, MD, FRCSC is a member of the following medical societies: Alpha Omega Alpha, American Academy of Ophthalmology, American Society of Retina Specialists, Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Canadian Medical Association, Canadian Ophthalmological Society, College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario, Ontario Medical Association, Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada

Disclosure: Serve(d) as a speaker or a member of a speakers bureau for: Novartis, Alcon, Bayer<br/>Received research grant from: Novartis, Alcon, Bayer<br/>Received consulting fee from Alcon for consulting; Received consulting fee from Novartis for consulting; Received consulting fee from Bayer for consulting; Received consulting fee from Allergan for consulting; Received consulting fee from B & L for consulting.

Louis Giavedoni, MD, FRCSE Co-Chief, Assistant Professor, Department of Ophthalmology, St Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Canada

Louis Giavedoni, MD, FRCSE is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Ophthalmology, Canadian Medical Association, Canadian Ophthalmological Society

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Specialty Editor Board

Simon K Law, MD, PharmD Clinical Professor of Health Sciences, Department of Ophthalmology, Jules Stein Eye Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine

Simon K Law, MD, PharmD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Ophthalmology, Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, American Glaucoma Society

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Steve Charles, MD Director of Charles Retina Institute; Clinical Professor, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Tennessee College of Medicine

Steve Charles, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Ophthalmology, American Society of Retina Specialists, Macula Society, Retina Society, Club Jules Gonin

Disclosure: Received royalty and consulting fees for: Alcon Laboratories.

Chief Editor

Hampton Roy, Sr, MD Associate Clinical Professor, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

Hampton Roy, Sr, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Ophthalmology, American College of Surgeons, Pan-American Association of Ophthalmology

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Additional Contributors

Andrew W Lawton, MD Neuro-Ophthalmology, Ochsner Health Services

Andrew W Lawton, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Ophthalmology, Arkansas Medical Society, Southern Medical Association

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

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Metal intraocular foreign body located in the left temporal pars plana region seen on axial CT scan.
Same metallic intraocular foreign body as in previous image, as seen on coronal CT scan view.
 
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