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Infantile Cortical Hyperostosis Treatment & Management

  • Author: Cara Novick, MD; Chief Editor: Harris Gellman, MD  more...
 
Updated: Dec 17, 2014
 

Medical Care

No specific treatment exists for infantile cortical hyperostosis. The disease is self-limited and usually resolves without sequelae. Some periods of exacerbation and remission may occur during the course of this condition.

Corticosteroids may be helpful in alleviating symptoms in severe cases, but these agents do not have any affect on the bone lesions. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may also be used to treat symptoms.

 
 
Contributor Information and Disclosures
Author

Cara Novick, MD Consulting Surgeon, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Shriners Hospital for Children of Tampa

Cara Novick, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Coauthor(s)

Dennis P Grogan, MD Clinical Professor (Retired), Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of South Florida College of Medicine; Orthopedic Surgeon, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Shriners Hospital for Children of Tampa

Dennis P Grogan, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Medical Association, American Orthopaedic Association, Scoliosis Research Society, Irish American Orthopaedic Society, Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society, Eastern Orthopaedic Association

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Specialty Editor Board

Francisco Talavera, PharmD, PhD Adjunct Assistant Professor, University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Pharmacy; Editor-in-Chief, Medscape Drug Reference

Disclosure: Received salary from Medscape for employment. for: Medscape.

Jerome D Wiedel, MD Chair, Professor, Department of Orthopedics, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Chief Editor

Harris Gellman, MD Consulting Surgeon, Broward Hand Center; Voluntary Clinical Professor of Orthopedic Surgery and Plastic Surgery, Departments of Orthopedic Surgery and Surgery, University of Miami, Leonard M Miller School of Medicine, Clinical Professor, Surgery, Nova Southeastern School of Medicine

Harris Gellman, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Medical Acupuncture, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, American Orthopaedic Association, American Society for Surgery of the Hand, Arkansas Medical Society

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Additional Contributors

Mininder S Kocher, MD, MPH Associate Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Harvard Medical School/Harvard School of Public Health; Associate Director, Division of Sports Medicine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Children's Hospital Boston

Mininder S Kocher, MD, MPH is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, American College of Sports Medicine, Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America, American Association for the History of Medicine, American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine, Massachusetts Medical Society

Disclosure: Received consulting fee from Smith & Nephew Endoscopy for consulting; Received consulting fee from EBI Biomet for consulting; Received consulting fee from OrthoPediatrics for consulting; Received stock from Pivot Medical for consulting; Received consulting fee from pediped for consulting; Received royalty from WB Saunders for none; Received stock from Fixes-4-Kids for consulting.

References
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Radiograph from a 5-month-old infant with infantile cortical hyperostosis. This image depicts cortical thickening in the pelvis secondary to the disease.
 
 
 
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