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Antibiotic Prophylactic Regimens for Endocarditis 

  • Author: Mary L Windle, PharmD; Chief Editor: Karlheinz Peter, MD, PhD  more...
 
Updated: Mar 17, 2016
 

AMA Recommendations

The antibiotic prophylactic regimens below are recommended by the American Heart Association (AHA) only  for patients with underlying cardiac conditions associated with the highest risk of adverse outcome from infective endocarditis.[1]

For further information on infective endocarditis, see Infective Endocarditis, Pediatric Bacterial Endocarditis, Infectious Endocarditis, and Neurological Sequelae of Infective Endocarditis.

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High-Risk Cardiac Conditions

Antibiotic prophylaxis is indicated for the following high-risk cardiac conditions:

  • Prosthetic cardiac valve
  • History of infective endocarditis (see image below)
  • Congenital heart disease (CHD) ( except for the conditions listed, antibiotic prophylaxis is no longer recommended for any other form of CHD): (1) unrepaired cyanotic CHD, including palliative shunts and conduits; (2) completely repaired congenital heart defect with prosthetic material or device, whether placed by surgery or by catheter intervention, during the first 6 months after the procedure; and (3) repaired CHD with residual defects at the site or adjacent to the site of a prosthetic patch or prosthetic device (which inhibits endothelialization)
  • Cardiac transplantation recipients with cardiac valvular disease
    Acute bacterial endocarditis caused by Staphylococ Acute bacterial endocarditis caused by Staphylococcus aureus with aortic valve ring abscess extending into myocardium. Courtesy of Janet Jones, MD, Laboratory Service, Wichita Veterans Administration Medical Center.
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Dental Procedures

For patients with high cardiac risk, antibiotic prophylaxis is recommended for all dental procedures that involve manipulation of gingival tissue or the periapical region of teeth or perforation of the oral mucosa.

The following dental procedures do not require endocarditis prophylaxis:

  • Routine anesthetic injections through noninfected tissue
  • Taking dental radiographs
  • Placement of removable prosthodontic or orthodontic appliances
  • Adjustment of orthodontic appliances
  • Placement of orthodontic brackets
  • Shedding of deciduous teeth
  • Bleeding from trauma to the lips or oral mucosa

Follow-up of guideline changes by AHA and NICE

Several studies have tracked the incidence of viridans group streptococci infective endocarditis (VGS-IE) following the guideline changes in the United States and the United Kingdom instituted in 2007 and 2008 respectively.

In the United States, Desimone et al found no perceivable increase in the incidence of VGS-IE in a localized area of Minnesota since the publication of the 2007 AHA endocarditis prevention guidelines. Rates of incidence (per 100,000 person-years) during the intervals of 1999-2002, 2003-2006, 2007-2010, and 2011-2013 were 3.6, 2.7, 0.7, and 1.5, respectively, reflecting an overall significant decrease (P=.03 from Poisson regression). Likewise, nationwide estimates of hospital discharges with a VGS-IE diagnosis trended downward during 2000-2011, with a mean number per year of 15,853 and 16,157 for 2000-2003 and 2004-2007, respectively, decreasing to 14,231 in 2008-2011 (P=.05 from linear regression using weighted least squares method).[2, 3]  

The findings of one study supported the 2008 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) in the United Kingdom guideline recommendations that antibiotic prophylaxis prior to invasive dental procedures was likely to not be of benefit in preventing infective endocarditis in patients with a history of rheumatic fever or a heart murmur. The authors did suggest though that patients at highest risk (eg, those with prosthetic valves) still might benefit.[4] Note that the study was conducted in England; therefore, a limitation of the study is the external generalizability of the findings to other countries.

Dayer et al investigated changes in the prescribing of antibiotic prophylaxis and the incidence of infective endocarditis in England since the introduction of the 2008 NICE guidelines. Although the data from the study did not establish a causal association, prescriptions of antibiotic prophylaxis have fallen substantially and the incidence of infective endocarditis has increased significantly in England since introduction of the 2008 NICE guidelines.[5]  Thornhill et al also reported that since March 2008 there has been an increase in IE cases since the 2008 NICE guidelines.[6] The NICE Clinical Guidelines were updated in 2015 to address this research that reported an increase in IE cases, however, NICE did not change their recommendations and no longer recommended antibiotic prophylaxis in patients at high-risk of IE who are undergoing high-risk dental procedures.[7, 8] In 2015, The Task Force for the Management of Infective Endocarditis of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) released their guidelines that continued to recommend antibiotic prophylaxis only for patients at the highest risk.[9]

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Respiratory Tract, Infected Skin, Skin Structures, or Musculoskeletal Tissue Procedures

Antibiotic prophylaxis is recommended for invasive respiratory tract procedures that involve incision or biopsy of the respiratory mucosa (eg, tonsillectomy, adenoidectomy). Antibiotic prophylaxis is not  recommended for bronchoscopy unless the procedure involves incision of the respiratory tract mucosa. For invasive respiratory tract procedures to treat an established infection (eg, drainage of abscess, empyema), administer an antibiotic that is active against Streptococcus viridans.

Patients with high cardiac risk who undergo a surgical procedure that involves infected skin, skin structure, or musculoskeletal tissue should receive an agent active against staphylococci and beta-hemolytic streptococci (eg, antistaphylococcal penicillin, cephalosporin).

If the causative organism of respiratory, skin, skin structure, or musculoskeletal infection is known or suspected to be Staphylococcus aureus, administer an antistaphylococcal penicillin or cephalosporin, or vancomycin (if patient is unable to tolerate beta-lactam antibiotics). Vancomycin is recommended for known or suspected methicillin-resistant strains of S aureus.

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Genitourinary or GI Tract Procedures

Antibiotics are no longer recommended for endocarditis prophylaxis for patients undergoing genitourinary or gastrointestinal tract procedures.

Orthopaedic Guidelines

A new clinical practice guideline produced jointly by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) and the American Dental Association (ADA) was published in April 2013.[10] The recommendation proposes that the practitioner consider changing the long-standing practice of routinely prescribing prophylactic antibiotic for patients with orthopaedic implants who undergo dental procedures. The grade of recommendation is listed as limited, indicating there is unconvincing evidence. The previous guideline from 2003 was updated in 2009 and endorsed antibiotic prophylaxis before dental procedures for all patients with prosthetic joints, with no 2-year time limit.[11] The 2009 guideline position has been criticized for excessive and unwarranted antibiotic use.[12]

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Treatment Regimens

The most common cause of endocarditis for dental, oral, respiratory tract, or esophageal procedures is S viridans (alpha-hemolytic streptococci). Antibiotic regimens for endocarditis prophylaxis are directed toward S viridans, and the recommended standard prophylactic regimen is a single dose of oral amoxicillin. Amoxicillin, ampicillin, and penicillin V are equally effective in vitro against alpha-hemolytic streptococci; however, amoxicillin is preferred because of superior gastrointestinal absorption that provides higher and more sustained serum levels.

All doses shown below are administered once as a single dose 30-60 min before the procedure.

Standard general prophylaxis

Amoxicillin

Adult dose: 2 g PO

Pediatric dose: 50 mg/kg PO; not to exceed 2 g/dose

Unable to take oral medication

Ampicillin

Adult dose: 2 g IV/IM

Pediatric dose: 50 mg/kg IV/IM; not to exceed 2 g/dose

Allergic to penicillin

Clindamycin

Adult dose: 600 mg PO

Pediatric dose: 20 mg/kg PO; not to exceed 600 mg/dose

Allergic to penicillin

Cephalexin or other first- or second-generation oral cephalosporin in equivalent dose (do not use cephalosporins in patients with a history of immediate-type hypersensitivity penicillin allergy, such as urticaria, angioedema, anaphylaxis)

Adult dose: 2 g PO

Pediatric dose: 50 mg/kg PO; not to exceed 2 g/dose

Azithromycin or clarithromycin

Adult dose: 500 mg PO

Pediatric dose: 15 mg/kg PO; not to exceed 500 mg/dose

Allergic to penicillin and unable to take oral medication

Clindamycin

Adult dose: 600 mg IV

Pediatric dose: 20 mg/kg IV; not to exceed 600 mg/dose

Cefazolin or ceftriaxone (do not use cephalosporins in patients with a history of immediate-type hypersensitivity penicillin allergy, such as urticaria, angioedema, anaphylaxis)

Adult dose: 1 g IV/IM

Pediatric dose: 50 mg/kg IV/IM; not to exceed 1 g/dose

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Contributor Information and Disclosures
Author

Mary L Windle, PharmD Adjunct Associate Professor, University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Pharmacy; Editor-in-Chief, Medscape Drug Reference

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Chief Editor

Karlheinz Peter, MD, PhD Professor of Medicine, Monash University; Head of Centre of Thrombosis and Myocardial Infarction, Head of Division of Atherothrombosis and Vascular Biology, Associate Director, Baker Heart Research Institute; Interventional Cardiologist, The Alfred Hospital, Australia

Karlheinz Peter, MD, PhD is a member of the following medical societies: American Heart Association, German Cardiac Society, Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

References
  1. Wilson W, Taubert KA, Gewitz M, Lockhart PB, Baddour LM, Levison M, et al. Prevention of infective endocarditis: guidelines from the American Heart Association: a guideline from the American Heart Association Rheumatic Fever, Endocarditis, and Kawasaki Disease Committee, Council on Cardiovascular Disease in the Young, and the Council on Clinical Cardiology, Council on Cardiovascular Surgery and Anesthesia, and the Quality of Care and Outcomes Research Interdisciplinary Working Group. Circulation. 2007 Oct 9. 116(15):1736-54. [Medline]. [Full Text].

  2. Desimone DC, Tleyjeh IM, Correa de Sa DD, Anavekar NS, Lahr BD, Sohail MR, et al. Incidence of infective endocarditis caused by viridans group streptococci before and after publication of the 2007 American Heart Association's endocarditis prevention guidelines. Circulation. 2012 Jul 3. 126 (1):60-4. [Medline]. [Full Text].

  3. DeSimone DC, Tleyjeh IM, Correa de Sa DD, Anavekar NS, Lahr BD, Sohail MR, et al. Incidence of Infective Endocarditis Due to Viridans Group Streptococci Before and After the 2007 American Heart Association's Prevention Guidelines: An Extended Evaluation of the Olmsted County, Minnesota, Population and Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Mayo Clin Proc. 2015 Jul. 90 (7):874-81. [Medline].

  4. Thornhill MH, Dayer MJ, Forde JM, Corey GR, Chu VH, Couper DJ, et al. Impact of the NICE guideline recommending cessation of antibiotic prophylaxis for prevention of infective endocarditis: before and after study. BMJ. 2011 May 3. 342:d2392. [Medline]. [Full Text].

  5. Dayer MJ, Jones S, Prendergast B, Baddour LM, Lockhart PB, Thornhill MH. Incidence of infective endocarditis in England, 2000-13: a secular trend, interrupted time-series analysis. Lancet. 2014 Nov 18. [Medline].

  6. Thornhill MH, Lockhart PB, Prendergast B, Chambers JB, Shanson D. NICE and antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent endocarditis. Br Dent J. 2015 Jun 12. 218 (11):619-21. [Medline].

  7. National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence. Prophylaxis against infective endocarditis. Clinical guideline 64.1. Methods, evidence and recommendations. Available at http://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/cg64/evidence/full-guideline-addendum-196759982. September 2015; Accessed: March 18, 2016.

  8. Chambers JB, Thornhill M, Shanson D, Prendergast B. Antibiotic prophylaxis of endocarditis: a NICE mess. Lancet Infect Dis. 2016 Mar. 16 (3):275-6. [Medline].

  9. Habib G, Lancellotti P, Antunes MJ, et al. 2015 ESC Guidelines for the management of infective endocarditis: The Task Force for the Management of Infective Endocarditis of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). Endorsed by: European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery (EACTS), the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM). Eur Heart J. 2015 Nov 21. 36 (44):3075-128. [Medline].

  10. Rethman MP, Watters W, Abt E, Anderson PA, Carroll KC, Evans RP, et al. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and the American Dental Association clinical practice guideline on: The prevention of orthopaedic implant infection in patients undergoing dental procedures. J Bone Joint Surg Am. April 2013. 95(8):745-47.

  11. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Information Statement 1033: Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Bacteremia in Patients with Joint Replacements. Available at http://orthodoc.aaos.org/davidgrimmmd/Antibiotic%20Prophylaxis%20for%20Patients%20after%20Total%20Joint%20Replacement.pdf. Accessed: May 14, 2013.

  12. Little JW, Jacobson JJ, Lockhart PB. The dental treatment of patients with joint replacements: a position paper from the American Academy of Oral Medicine. J Am Dent Assoc. 2010 Jun. 141(6):667-71. [Medline].

  13. Nishimura RA, Otto CM, Bonow RO, Carabello BA, Erwin JP 3rd, Guyton RA, et al. 2014 AHA/ACC Guideline for the Management of Patients With Valvular Heart Disease: executive summary: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines. Circulation. 2014 Jun 10. 129(23):2440-92. [Medline].

 
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Acute bacterial endocarditis caused by Staphylococcus aureus with aortic valve ring abscess extending into myocardium. Courtesy of Janet Jones, MD, Laboratory Service, Wichita Veterans Administration Medical Center.
 
 
 
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