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Mushroom Toxicity Differential Diagnoses

  • Author: B Zane Horowitz, MD, FACMT; Chief Editor: Asim Tarabar, MD  more...
 
Updated: Dec 29, 2015
 
 

Diagnostic Considerations

In addition to the conditions listed in the differential diagnosis, poisoning with the following cholinergic and anticholinesterase agents should be considered in patients with signs and symptoms of a cholinergic syndrome:

  • Bethanechol
  • Carbachol
  • Cevimeline
  • Methacholine
  • Pilocarpine
  • Physostigmine
  • Neostigmine
  • Pyridostigmine

Differential Diagnoses

 
 
Contributor Information and Disclosures
Author

B Zane Horowitz, MD, FACMT Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, Oregon Health and Sciences University School of Medicine; Medical Director, Oregon Poison Center; Medical Director, Alaska Poison Control System

B Zane Horowitz, MD, FACMT is a member of the following medical societies: American College of Medical Toxicology

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Coauthor(s)

Robert G Hendrickson, MD Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University School of Medicine; Attending Physician, Medical Director, Emergency Management Program, Department of Emergency Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University Hospital and Health Systems; Associate Medical Director, Director, Fellowship in Medical Toxicology, Disaster Preparedness Coordinator, Oregon Poison Center; Clinical Toxicologist, Alaska Poison Center and Guam Poison Center

Robert G Hendrickson, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Clinical Toxicology, American College of Emergency Physicians, American College of Medical Toxicology, Society for Academic Emergency Medicine

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Chief Editor

Asim Tarabar, MD Assistant Professor, Director, Medical Toxicology, Department of Emergency Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine; Consulting Staff, Department of Emergency Medicine, Yale-New Haven Hospital

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Acknowledgements

William Banner Jr, MD, PhD Medical Director, Oklahoma Poison Control Center; Clinical Professor of Pharmacy, Oklahoma University College of Pharmacy-Tulsa; Adjunct Clinical Professor of Pediatrics, Oklahoma State University College of Osteopathic Medicine

William Banner Jr, MD, PhD, is a member of the following medical societies: American College of Medical Toxicology

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose

Peter A Chyka, PharmD, FAACT, DABAT Professor and Executive Associate Dean, College of Pharmacy, University of Tennessee Health Science Center

Peter A Chyka, PharmD, FAACT, DABAT is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Clinical Toxicology, American College of Clinical Pharmacy, and American Society of Health-System Pharmacists

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Timothy E Corden, MD Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Co-Director, Policy Core, Injury Research Center, Medical College of Wisconsin; Associate Director, PICU, Children's Hospital of Wisconsin

Timothy E Corden, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Pediatrics, Phi Beta Kappa, Society of Critical Care Medicine, and Wisconsin Medical Society

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Laurie Robin Grier, MD Medical Director of MICU, Professor of Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, Anesthesiology and OBGYN, Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Louisiana State University Health Science Center at Shreveport

Laurie Robin Grier, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American College of Chest Physicians, American College of Physicians, American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, and Society of Critical Care Medicine

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Rania Habal, MD Assistant Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, New York Medical College

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Jorge A Martinez, MD, JD Clinical Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, Louisiana State University School of Medicine in New Orleans; Clinical Instructor, Department of Surgery, Tulane School of Medicine

Jorge A Martinez, MD, JD is a member of the following medical societies: Alpha Omega Alpha, American Academy of Emergency Medicine, American College of Cardiology, American College of Emergency Physicians, American College of Physicians, and Louisiana State Medical Society

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Michael E Mullins, MD Assistant Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine

Michael E Mullins, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Clinical Toxicology and American College of Emergency Physicians

Disclosure: Johnson & Johnson stock ownership None; Savient Pharmaceuticals stock ownership None

Daniel R Ouellette, MD, FCCP Associate Professor of Medicine, Wayne State University School of Medicine; Consulting Staff, Pulmonary Disease and Critical Care Medicine Service, Henry Ford Health System

Daniel R Ouellette, MD, FCCP is a member of the following medical societies: American College of Chest Physicians and American Thoracic Society

Disclosure: Boehringer Ingleheim Honoraria Speaking and teaching; Pfizer Honoraria Speaking and teaching; Astra Zeneca Honoraria Speaking and teaching

Francisco Talavera, PharmD, PhD Adjunct Assistant Professor, University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Pharmacy; Editor-in-Chief, Medscape Drug Reference

Disclosure: Medscape Salary Employment

Jeffrey R Tucker, MD Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Emergency Medicine, University of Connecticut and Connecticut Children's Medical Center

Disclosure: Merck Salary Employment

Mary L Windle, PharmD Adjunct Associate Professor, University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Pharmacy; Editor-in-Chief, Medscape Drug Reference

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

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Amanita phalloides.
Inocybe geophylla.
Inocybe lacera.
Clitocybe dealbata.
Omphalotus olearius (Jack O'Lantern mushroom).
 
 
 
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