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Erythrocyte Count (RBC) 

  • Author: Choladda Vejabhuti Curry, MD; Chief Editor: Thomas M Wheeler, MD  more...
 
Updated: Jan 13, 2015
 

Reference Range

4.52-5.90 x1012/L in adult male[1]

4.10-5.10 x1012/L in adult female[1]

Normal values may vary depending on the individual laboratory and ages.

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Interpretation

Red blood cell count is elevated in the following conditions:[2]

Red blood cell count is decreased in the following conditions:[2]

  • Hemolysis
  • Chronic renal failure
  • Hemorrhage
  • Failure of marrow production

Red blood cell count (RBC) can also be used with MCV to aid in the differential diagnosis between iron deficiency and β- or α-thalassemia trait. Increased RBCs with decreased MCV is suggestive of thalassemia trait. An MCV/RBC ratio of less than 13 suggests thalassemia trait, whereas a ratio of greater than 13 suggests iron deficiency. However, this ratio is not definitive for diagnosis, and more definitive tests should be performed when available.[6]

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Collection and Panels

Collection and panel details are as follows:

  • Specimen: whole blood, usually collected by venipuncture
  • Collection: EDTA tube (purple/lavender top) containing EDTA potassium salt additive as an anticoagulant (see image below)[7]
    EDTA Tubes EDTA Tubes
  • Panels: complete blood count (CBC)
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Background

Description

Red blood cell count (RBC) is a number of red blood cells per unit volume of blood. RBC then increases either due to relatively decreased plasma volume such as dehydration/hemoconcentration or due to absolute increase in red blood cell production such as in renal cell carcinoma (due to erythropoietin production) or polycythemia vera. RBC decreases in anemia or blood loss. See the Interpretation section.

Indications/Applications

Red blood cell count is part of a standard complete blood count (CBC) and is used along with hemoglobin concentration and hematocrit to determine if a patient has anemia, polycythemia, dehydration, or response to treatment related to those conditions. RBC usually rises or falls along with hemoglobin or hematocrit.

Considerations

Red blood cell count along with hemoglobin concentration, and hematocrit should be interpreted with cautions because the measurement is relative to plasma volume. Conditions that increase plasma volume such as pregnancy will decrease these values and do not reflect absolute anemia. On the other hand, conditions that decrease plasma volume such as dehydration will increase these values and do not reflect absolute polycythemia.

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Contributor Information and Disclosures
Author

Choladda Vejabhuti Curry, MD Assistant Professor of Pathology and Immunology, Baylor College of Medicine; Hematopathologist and Cytopathologist, Section of Hematopathology, Texas Children's Hospital

Choladda Vejabhuti Curry, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Society for Clinical Pathology, American Society of Cytopathology, American Society of Hematology, College of American Pathologists, United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology, Society for Hematopathology, European Association for Haematopathology, International Clinical Cytometry Society

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Chief Editor

Thomas M Wheeler, MD Chairman, Department of Pathology and Immunology, WL Moody, Jr, Professor of Pathology, Professor of Urology, Baylor College of Medicine

Thomas M Wheeler, MD is a member of the following medical societies: Alpha Omega Alpha, American Association for Cancer Research, American Medical Association, American Society for Clinical Pathology, American Society of Cytopathology, American Thyroid Association, American Urological Association, College of American Pathologists, United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology, International Society of Urological Pathology, Harris County Medical Society

Disclosure: Received stock from PathXL for medical advisory board. for: PathXL, Inc.

References
  1. Vajpayee N, Graham SS, Bem S. Basic Examination of Blood and Bone Marrow. McPherson RA, Pincus MR. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods. 22nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier/Saunders; 2011. chap 30.

  2. Ferri FF. Surviving the wards. Ferri: Practical Guide to the Care of the Medical Patient. 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Mosby/Elsvier; 2011. Chap 1.

  3. Colin Y, Le Van Kim C, El Nemer W. Red cell adhesion in human diseases. Curr Opin Hematol. 2014 May. 21(3):186-92. [Medline].

  4. Barbui T, Thiele J, Carobbio A, Gisslinger H, Finazzi G, Rumi E, et al. Masked polycythemia vera diagnosed according to WHO and BCSH classification. Am J Hematol. 2014 Feb. 89(2):199-202. [Medline].

  5. Du Pont-Thibodeau G, Harrington K, Lacroix J. Anemia and red blood cell transfusion in critically ill cardiac patients. Ann Intensive Care. 2014. 4:16. [Medline]. [Full Text].

  6. Elghetany MT, Banki K. Erythrocytic Disorders. McPherson RA, Pincus MR. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by laboratory Methods. 22nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier/Saunders; 2011. Chap 32.

  7. Hussein E, Enein A. Clinical and Quality Evaluation of Red Blood Cell Units Collected Via Apheresis Versus Those Obtained Manually. Lab Med. 2014 Summer. 45(3):238-243. [Medline].

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