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Mycoplasma Infections Workup

  • Author: Ken B Waites, MD; Chief Editor: Michael Stuart Bronze, MD  more...
 
Updated: Oct 08, 2015
 

Laboratory Studies

Consider the possibility of infection with M pneumoniae in patients of any age who present with respiratory tract infections. Laboratory investigation should focus on both the clinical illness (eg, tracheobronchitis vs pneumonia) and the many possible infectious etiologies that can cause clinically similar manifestations. The extent of laboratory investigation also should reflect the severity of the illness and whether the illness warrants hospitalization.[11, 12]

In as many as half of all cases of community-acquired pneumonias, the microbiological etiology is never determined, despite appropriate laboratory testing. The typical mild illness caused by M pneumoniae in otherwise healthy persons may not warrant a comprehensive microbiological investigation because empiric treatment with oral antimicrobials can cover M pneumoniae and most other bacterial agents that produce similar illnesses.

Laboratory analysis

Twenty-five percent of patients develop leukocytosis; the rest have leukocyte counts within the reference range.

Thirty percent of patients have an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate.

Cellular response of sputum is mononuclear, with no bacteria visible with Gram staining.

About 75% of patients have a cold agglutinin titer of at least 1:32 by the second week of illness, disappearing by 6-8 weeks. This is not a specific test for M pneumoniae infection but the greater the cold agglutinin titer is (>1:64) in a patient with community-acquired pneumonia, the more likely the cold agglutinins are due to M pneumoniae. No specific abnormalities of hepatic or renal function are likely to occur.[13, 14, 12]

To confirm mycoplasmal respiratory tract infection, culture, molecular-based tests, and/or serological tests are necessary.

Culture

Respiratory tract specimens suitable for culture include throat swabs, sputum, tracheal aspirates, bronchial lavage fluid, pleural fluid, or lung biopsy tissue, depending on the patient's clinical condition.

Mycoplasmal organisms have fastidious growth requirements and are often difficult and slow to grow in vitro. Take care during specimen collection to inoculate into a suitable transport medium (eg, SP4 broth or universal transport medium), at the bedside whenever possible, and to not allow desiccation. Clinicians advise freezing at -70°C if specimens cannot be transported to the diagnostic laboratory immediately after collection.

Growth in culture is slow, requiring 3 weeks or longer in some cases, and the culture is not extremely sensitive for detecting M pneumoniae infection. The culture medium is often unavailable except from specialized reference laboratories. If culture is attempted, alternative procedures including serology and/or molecular-based nucleic acid amplification tests should also be performed.[10]

Serological testing

Physicians use serology most frequently to confirm M pneumoniae infection even though these tests suffer from significant problems.

Many clinicians prefer enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays to the older, less sensitive complement fixation assays and nonspecific cold agglutinin titers. These types of tests are widely available through commercial reference laboratories.

Because primary infection does not guarantee protective immunity against future infections and residual immunoglobulin G (IgG) may remain from earlier encounters with the organism, experts have launched a great impetus to develop sensitive and specific tests that can differentiate between acute and remote infection.

Definitive diagnosis requires seroconversion documented by paired specimens obtained 2-4 weeks apart. Although some researchers purport that single-titer immunoglobulin M (IgM) or immunoglobulin A (IgA) assays reveal current infection, IgM may persist for up to several months in some people, and many adults may not mount a detectable IgM response. Therefore, relying on a single serological test can be clinically misleading, and experts recommend basing diagnosis of acute infection on seroconversion measured simultaneously in assays for both IgM and IgG. Use of serology for diagnosis of mycoplasmal infection is valid only if the patient has a satisfactory capacity of the humoral immune system to mount an antibody response.

Rapid diagnostic enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays

One of the most significant advances in recent years for the diagnosis of M pneumoniae respiratory tract infections is the development of qualitative, rapid, single-specimen, membrane-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays that are readily adaptable to the primary care physician's office laboratory.[15]

The Remel IgG/IgM Antibody Test System (Thermo-Fisher) measures both IgG and IgM simultaneously.

The Meridian ImmunoCard (Meridian Bioscience, Inc.) measures only IgM.

Physicians can perform both tests without special expertise or equipment, and they can interpret the results in approximately 10 minutes, eliminating the need for collection of paired sera for later antibody measurement, although erroneous results are sometimes obtained when only single serum samples are analyzed.[15, 16]

Both tests have a moderate complexity classification under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendment (CLIA), allowing many physicians to offer serologic assays for M pneumoniae antibodies as a point-of-care test so that it can be used to direct patient management.

Such single-specimen assays have limitations as described above; perhaps the most practical use for the IgM ImmunoCard is when an acute infection with M pneumoniae is suspected in children and young adults.

Molecular analysis

Researchers have developed molecular-based systems for detection of M pneumoniae using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or other technologies. A variety of gene targets have been described for PCR assays to detect M pneumoniae in clinical specimens. Traditional PCR is gradually being replaced by quantitative real-time PCR assays. Recent publications indicate that the CARDS toxin gene is more sensitive for M pneumoniae detection than assays targeting the P1 protein or ATPase genes.[17]

Some reference laboratories offer PCR assays that they developed themselves for detection of current mycoplasmal infection. Two molecular-based tests for detection of M pneumoniae are now FDA-approved for use in the United States. One of these is the illumigene Mycoplasma assay (Meridian Bioscience, Inc.). This loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay enables detection of M pneumoniae in up to 10 clinical specimens that can be tested simultaneously within one hour after extracted DNA is set up in the incubator/reader. The multiplex Biofire Diagnostics FilmArray RP detects nucleic acids in nasopharyngeal swabs for 20 respiratory tract pathogens, including M pneumoniae, processing one sample at a time, with results in about an hour .

Carriage of mycoplasmas in the upper respiratory tract for variable periods following prior infection may confound the interpretation of a single positive PCR assay result. Furthermore, a PCR assay may reveal very small numbers of organisms that may not be of etiologic significance.

A specific threshold of quantity of mycoplasmas in the respiratory tract that can differentiate colonization from infection has not been established, so a highly sensitive detection method such as PCR performed in a nonquantitative manner may overestimate the clinical importance of M pneumoniae as a pathogen since it often cocirculates with other bacterial and viral respiratory pathogens. For these reasons, molecular-based assays can be accompanied by serological assays for maximum diagnostic accuracy unless testing a normally sterile body fluid in which the presence of any number of mycoplasmas would be considered evidence of disease.[1] Newer quantitative real-time PCR assays alleviate this problem to some degree.

Given the significant limitations of serology, prolonged turnaround time and insensitivity of culture, and the growing availability of rapid diagnosis of mycoplasmal infection in symptomatic patients by molecular-based assays, molecular-based tests are now the preferred method for diagnosis of M pneumoniae infection when available to primary care physicians through a hospital or reference laboratory.

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Imaging Studies

Abnormalities on chest radiographs often appear more severe than predicted based on the clinical condition of the patient.

Lobar consolidation is unusual.

Diffuse or interstitial infiltrates that involve the lower lobes are the most common radiographic abnormalities.

Small pleural effusions may develop in approximately 20% of cases.

Lung involvement tends to be unilateral but can be bilateral.

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Contributor Information and Disclosures
Author

Ken B Waites, MD Director, UAB Diagnostic Mycoplasma Laboratory, Professor, Department of Pathology, Division of Laboratory Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine

Ken B Waites, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Society for Microbiology

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Specialty Editor Board

Francisco Talavera, PharmD, PhD Adjunct Assistant Professor, University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Pharmacy; Editor-in-Chief, Medscape Drug Reference

Disclosure: Received salary from Medscape for employment. for: Medscape.

Charles V Sanders, MD Edgar Hull Professor and Chairman, Department of Internal Medicine, Professor of Microbiology, Immunology and Parasitology, Louisiana State University School of Medicine at New Orleans; Medical Director, Medicine Hospital Center, Charity Hospital and Medical Center of Louisiana at New Orleans; Consulting Staff, Ochsner Medical Center

Charles V Sanders, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American College of Physicians, Alliance for the Prudent Use of Antibiotics, The Foundation for AIDS Research, Southern Society for Clinical Investigation, Southwestern Association of Clinical Microbiology, Association of Professors of Medicine, Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, American Clinical and Climatological Association, Infectious Disease Society for Obstetrics and Gynecology, Orleans Parish Medical Society, Southeastern Clinical Club, American Association for the Advancement of Science, Alpha Omega Alpha, American Association of University Professors, American Association for Physician Leadership, American Federation for Medical Research, American Geriatrics Society, American Lung Association, American Medical Association, American Society for Microbiology, American Thoracic Society, American Venereal Disease Association, Association of American Medical Colleges, Association of American Physicians, Infectious Diseases Society of America, Louisiana State Medical Society, Royal Society of Medicine, Sigma Xi, Society of General Internal Medicine, Southern Medical Association

Disclosure: Received royalty from Baxter International for other.

Chief Editor

Michael Stuart Bronze, MD David Ross Boyd Professor and Chairman, Department of Medicine, Stewart G Wolf Endowed Chair in Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Oklahoma Health Science Center; Master of the American College of Physicians; Fellow, Infectious Diseases Society of America

Michael Stuart Bronze, MD is a member of the following medical societies: Alpha Omega Alpha, American Medical Association, Oklahoma State Medical Association, Southern Society for Clinical Investigation, Association of Professors of Medicine, American College of Physicians, Infectious Diseases Society of America

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Additional Contributors

Maria D Mileno, MD Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University

Maria D Mileno, MD is a member of the following medical societies: Alpha Omega Alpha, American College of Physicians, American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, Infectious Diseases Society of America, International Society of Travel Medicine, Sigma Xi

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

References
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