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Glomerulonephritis Associated with Nonstreptococcal Infection Follow-up

  • Author: James W Lohr, MD; Chief Editor: Vecihi Batuman, MD, FACP, FASN  more...
 
Updated: Apr 28, 2015
 

Further Outpatient Care

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  • Oral antibiotics can be continued in an outpatient setting, with frequent monitoring of kidney function. Outpatient dialysis, if necessary, may need to be arranged.
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Further Inpatient Care

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  • Inpatient care depends on the severity of infection, and the need for hospitalization depends on the clinical condition of the patient (eg, the patient may require dialytic support or IV fluids and antibiotics).
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Inpatient & Outpatient Medications

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  • Oral antibiotics can be continued in an outpatient setting.
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Complications

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  • Deterioration of kidney function may require dialytic support.
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Prognosis

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  • Complete recovery occurs in most patients, even those patients with crescents observed in kidney biopsy tissue.
  • The outcome is based on the duration of infection before specific antibacterial or other antiinfective therapy is initiated.
  • In schistosomal infections, progression of renal disease is common, even after treatment.
  • Nephrotic-range proteinuria may persist for 6 months. A mild increase in protein excretion may be present in 15% of patients at 3 years and in 2-7% of patients at 10 years.
  • Microscopic hematuria may persist for 3-6 months after resolution of the syndrome.
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Patient Education

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Contributor Information and Disclosures
Author

James W Lohr, MD Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Nephrology, Fellowship Program Director, University of Buffalo State University of New York School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences

James W Lohr, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American College of Physicians, American Heart Association, American Society of Nephrology, Central Society for Clinical and Translational Research

Disclosure: Partner received salary from Alexion for employment.

Coauthor(s)

Quresh T Khairullah, MBBS, MD 

Quresh T Khairullah, MBBS, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American College of Physicians, American Society of Nephrology, International Society of Nephrology

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Specialty Editor Board

Francisco Talavera, PharmD, PhD Adjunct Assistant Professor, University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Pharmacy; Editor-in-Chief, Medscape Drug Reference

Disclosure: Received salary from Medscape for employment. for: Medscape.

Ajay K Singh, MB, MRCP, MBA Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Director of Dialysis, Renal Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital; Director, Brigham/Falkner Dialysis Unit, Faulkner Hospital

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Chief Editor

Vecihi Batuman, MD, FACP, FASN Huberwald Professor of Medicine, Section of Nephrology-Hypertension, Tulane University School of Medicine; Chief, Renal Section, Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System

Vecihi Batuman, MD, FACP, FASN is a member of the following medical societies: American College of Physicians, American Society of Hypertension, American Society of Nephrology, International Society of Nephrology

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

References
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