Atopic Dermatitis in Emergency Medicine Medication

  • Author: Cassandra Bradby, MD; Chief Editor: Barry E Brenner, MD, PhD, FACEP  more...
 
Updated: Jun 27, 2016
 

Medication Summary

Drug regimens for eczema should be tailored to the individual patient to reduce the frequency and severity of exacerbations.[15]

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Topical steroids

Class Summary

Topical steroids are very effective when used in the induction of remission and in the acute exacerbation of atopic dermatitis. Low- to medium-potency steroids should be used routinely, with medium-to-high potency steroids for more severe rashes.

Triamcinolone topical (Aristocort)

 

Triamcinolone topical  is a medium-potency topical steroid. It treats inflammatory dermatoses responsive to steroids. It decreases inflammation by suppressing the migration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes and reversing capillary permeability.

Hydrocortisone topical

 

Hydrocortisone topical is an example of a low-potency topical steroid available over the counter. It is an adrenocorticosteroid derivative suitable for application to skin or external mucous membranes. It has mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid effects resulting in anti-inflammatory activity.

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Topical calcineurin Inhibitors

Class Summary

Topical immune suppressants that block early T-cell activation, degranulation of mast cells, and multiple cytokines.

Pimecrolimus (Elidel cream)

 

Pimecrolimus was the first nonsteroid cream approved in the United States for mild-to-moderate atopic dermatitis. It is derived from ascomycin, a natural substance produced by fungus Streptomyces hygroscopicus var ascomyceticus. It selectively inhibits the production and release of inflammatory cytokines from activated T cells by binding to cytosolic immunophilin receptor macrophilin-12. The resulting complex inhibits phosphatase calcineurin, thus blocking T-cell activation and cytokine release. Cutaneous atrophy was not observed in clinical trials, a potential advantage over topical corticosteroids. It is indicated only after other treatment options have failed.

Tacrolimus ointment (Protopic)

 

The mechanism of action of tacrolimus in atopic dermatitis is not known. It reduces itching and inflammation by suppressing the release of cytokines from T cells. It also inhibits transcription for genes that encode IL-3, IL-4, IL-5, GM-CSF, and TNF-alpha, all of which are involved in the early stages of T-cell activation. Additionally, it may inhibit the release of preformed mediators from skin mast cells and basophils, and down-regulate the expression of FCeRI on Langerhans cells. Tacrolimus ointment can be used in patients as young as 2 years. Drugs of this class are more expensive than topical corticosteroids. It is available as an ointment in concentrations of 0.03% and 0.1%. It is indicated only after other treatment options have failed.

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Oral immunosuppressive agents

Class Summary

Oral immunosuppressive agents are for use in severe refractory atopic dermatitis.

Cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune)

 

Cyclosporine is an 11-amino acid cyclic peptide and a natural product of fungi. It acts on T-cell replication and activity. Cyclosporine is a specific modulator of T-cell function and an agent that depresses cell-mediated immune responses by inhibiting helper T-cell function. Preferential and reversible inhibition of T lymphocytes in the G0 or G1 phase of cell cycle is suggested. It binds to cyclophilin, an intracellular protein, which, in turn, prevents the formation of interleukin 2 and the subsequent recruitment of activated T cells.

Cyclosporine has about 30% bioavailability, but there is marked interindividual variability. It specifically inhibits T-lymphocyte function with minimal activity against B cells. Maximum suppression of T-lymphocyte proliferation requires that the drug be present during first 24 hours of antigenic exposure.

Cyclosporine suppresses some humoral immunity and, to a greater extent, cell-mediated immune reactions (eg, delayed hypersensitivity, allograft rejection, experimental allergic encephalomyelitis, and graft vs host disease) for a variety of organs.

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Antihistamines

Class Summary

Antihistamines are used for the sedating effects. They help to prevent scratching during sleep.

Hydroxyzine hydrochloride (Atarax, Vistaril)

 

Hydroxyzine hydrochloride antagonizes H1-receptors in the periphery. It also may suppress histamine activity in the subcortical region of the CNS. It is a sedating antihistamine.

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Contributor Information and Disclosures
Author

Cassandra Bradby, MD Clinical Assistant Instructor, Resident Physician, Department of Emergency Medicine, Kings County Hospital Center, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center

Cassandra Bradby, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Emergency Medicine, American College of Emergency Physicians, American Medical Association, National Medical Association, Emergency Medicine Residents' Association

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Coauthor(s)

Joshua Schechter, MD Clinical Assistant Professor, Director of Emergency Ultrasound Resident Education, Kings County Hospital Center, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center

Joshua Schechter, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American College of Emergency Physicians, Society for Academic Emergency Medicine

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Specialty Editor Board

Francisco Talavera, PharmD, PhD Adjunct Assistant Professor, University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Pharmacy; Editor-in-Chief, Medscape Drug Reference

Disclosure: Received salary from Medscape for employment. for: Medscape.

Chief Editor

Barry E Brenner, MD, PhD, FACEP Professor of Emergency Medicine, Professor of Internal Medicine, Program Director for Emergency Medicine, Case Medical Center, University Hospitals, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine

Barry E Brenner, MD, PhD, FACEP is a member of the following medical societies: Alpha Omega Alpha, American Heart Association, American Thoracic Society, Arkansas Medical Society, New York Academy of Medicine, New York Academy of Sciences, Society for Academic Emergency Medicine, American Academy of Emergency Medicine, American College of Chest Physicians, American College of Emergency Physicians, American College of Physicians

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Additional Contributors

Robert M McNamara, MD, FAAEM Chair and Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, Temple University School of Medicine

Robert M McNamara, MD, FAAEM is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Emergency Medicine, American Medical Association, Pennsylvania Medical Society, Society for Academic Emergency Medicine

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Acknowledgements

Jamie Alison Edelstein, MD Resident Physician, Department of Emergency Medicine, State University of New York, Kings County Hospital Center

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Mark W Fourre, MD Associate Clinical Professor, Department of Surgery, University of Vermont School of Medicine; Program Director, Department of Emergency Medicine, Maine Medical Center

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Anthony J Ghidorzi, Jr, DO Owner, Lakeview Laser Center, Ltd; Consulting Staff, Delnor Community Hospital

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Dara A Kass, MD Clinical Assistant Instructor, Department of Emergency Medicine, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Kings County Hospital

Dara A Kass, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American College of Emergency Physicians, Emergency Medicine Residents Association, and Society for Academic Emergency Medicine

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Richard H Sinert, DO Professor of Emergency Medicine, Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine, Research Director, State University of New York College of Medicine; Consulting Staff, Department of Emergency Medicine, Kings County Hospital Center

Richard H Sinert, DO is a member of the following medical societies: American College of Physicians and Society for Academic Emergency Medicine

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

References
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  15. [Guideline] Ring J, Alomar A, Bieber T, Deleuran M, Fink-Wagner A, Gelmetti C, et al. Guidelines for treatment of atopic eczema (atopic dermatitis) part I. J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2012 Aug. 26(8):1045-60. [Medline].

 
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