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Insect Bites Differential Diagnoses

  • Author: Boyd (Bo) D Burns, DO, FACEP, FAAEM; Chief Editor: Joe Alcock, MD, MS  more...
 
Updated: Jun 03, 2016
 
 
 
Contributor Information and Disclosures
Author

Boyd (Bo) D Burns, DO, FACEP, FAAEM Associate Professor, Interim Chair, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Oklahoma School of Community Medicine; Attending Physician, Department of Emergency Medicine, Hillcrest Medical Center

Boyd (Bo) D Burns, DO, FACEP, FAAEM is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Emergency Medicine, American College of Emergency Physicians, Society for Academic Emergency Medicine

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Coauthor(s)

 

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Specialty Editor Board

John T VanDeVoort, PharmD Regional Director of Pharmacy, Sacred Heart and St Joseph's Hospitals

John T VanDeVoort, PharmD is a member of the following medical societies: American Society of Health-System Pharmacists

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Gino A Farina, MD, FACEP, FAAEM Professor of Emergency Medicine, Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine at Hofstra University; Program Director, Department of Emergency Medicine, Long Island Jewish Medical Center

Gino A Farina, MD, FACEP, FAAEM is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Emergency Medicine, American College of Emergency Physicians, Society for Academic Emergency Medicine

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Chief Editor

Joe Alcock, MD, MS Associate Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center

Joe Alcock, MD, MS is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Emergency Medicine

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Additional Contributors

Robert M McNamara, MD, FAAEM Chair and Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, Temple University School of Medicine

Robert M McNamara, MD, FAAEM is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Emergency Medicine, American Medical Association, Pennsylvania Medical Society, Society for Academic Emergency Medicine

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Robert A Williams, MD Resident Physician, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Oklahoma College of Medicine

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Acknowledgements

Nicolas F Arredondo, MD Resident Physician, Department of Neurological Surgery, University of South Florida College of Medicine

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Kavon Charles Azadi, MD, Resident Physician, Emergency Medicine Department, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Miguel C Fernandez, MD, FAAEM, FACEP, FACMT, FACCT Associate Clinical Professor, Department of Surgery/Emergency Medicine and Toxicology, University of Texas School of Medicine at San Antonio; Medical and Managing Director, South Texas Poison Center

Miguel C Fernandez, MD, FAAEM, FACEP, FACMT, FACCT is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Emergency Medicine, American College of Clinical Toxicologists, American College of Emergency Physicians, American College of Medical Toxicology, American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Society for Academic Emergency Medicine, and Texas Medical Association

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

References
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Yellow jacket wasp. Image courtesy of US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Anopheles albimanus mosquito feeding on human host. Image courtesy of US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Insect Bites. Louse, Pediculus humanus, dorsal view after feeding on blood. Most lice are scavengers, feeding on skin and other debris found on the host's body, but some species feed on sebaceous secretions and blood. Image courtesy of US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Insect Bites. World Allergy Organization anaphylaxis pocket card. Reprinted from The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Vol 127, Issue 3, Simons FER et al, World Allergy Organization anaphylaxis guidelines; Summary, Pgs 587-93, March 2011, with permission from Elsevier. Available at http://www.jacionline.org/article/S0091-6749(11)00128-X/fulltext.
Fire ant (Solenopsis invicta). Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.
Fecal staining from bed bugs in the crevice of a mattress. © 2014 Australian Family Physician. Reproduced with permission from The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP), published in Doggett SL, Russell R. Bed bugs - What the GP needs to know. Aust Fam Physician. Nov 2009;38(11):880-4.
Various stages of the bed bug life cycle. © 2014 Australian Family Physician. Reproduced with permission from The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP), published in Doggett SL, Russell R. Bed bugs - What the GP needs to know. Aust Fam Physician. Nov 2009;38(11):880-4.
Kissing bug (Triatoma sanguisuga) can be a vector for Chagas disease. Image courtesy of US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
The Oriental rat flea (Xenopsylla cheopis). Image courtesy of US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Typical bed bug rash. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.
 
 
 
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