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Millipede Envenomation Medication

  • Author: Robert L Norris, MD; Chief Editor: Scott H Plantz, MD, FAAEM  more...
 
Updated: May 09, 2014
 

Medication Summary

Significant conjunctivitis or dermatitis caused by toxic millipede secretions can be treated with topical steroids.

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Ophthalmic agents

Class Summary

These agents prevent further ulcerations of the cornea and should be given in consultation with an ophthalmologist.

Prednisolone, ophthalmic (Pred Forte)

 

Decreases inflammation by suppressing the migration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes and reversing increased capillary permeability.

Prednisolone/sulfacetamide ophthalmic

 

Treats steroid-responsive inflammatory ocular conditions that have a risk of infection.

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Corticosteroid, Topical

Class Summary

Used to treat erythema and skin irritation that result from chemical insults. Prevent further ulcerations of the skin.

Triamcinolone topical

 

Treats inflammatory dermatitis that is responsive to steroids. Decreases inflammation by suppressing the migration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes and reversing capillary permeability.

Hydrocortisone topical

 

Treats inflammatory dermatitis responsive to steroids. Decreases inflammation by suppressing the migration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes and reversing capillary permeability.

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Contributor Information and Disclosures
Author

Robert L Norris, MD Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center

Robert L Norris, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American College of Emergency Physicians, Society for Academic Emergency Medicine, International Society of Toxinology, American Medical Association, California Medical Association, Wilderness Medical Society

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Specialty Editor Board

John T VanDeVoort, PharmD Regional Director of Pharmacy, Sacred Heart and St Joseph's Hospitals

John T VanDeVoort, PharmD is a member of the following medical societies: American Society of Health-System Pharmacists

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Richard H Sinert, DO Professor of Emergency Medicine, Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine, Research Director, State University of New York College of Medicine; Consulting Staff, Vice-Chair in Charge of Research, Department of Emergency Medicine, Kings County Hospital Center

Richard H Sinert, DO is a member of the following medical societies: American College of Physicians, Society for Academic Emergency Medicine

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Chief Editor

Scott H Plantz, MD, FAAEM Associate Clinical Professor of Emergency Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Louisville School of Medicine

Scott H Plantz, MD, FAAEM is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Emergency Medicine

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Additional Contributors

James Li, MD Former Assistant Professor, Division of Emergency Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Board of Directors, Remote Medicine

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

References
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  2. Peters S. A Colour Atlas of Arthropods in Clinical Medicine. Barcelona, Spain: Wolfe Publishing Ltd; 1992.

  3. Williams LA, Singh PD, Caleb-Williams LS. Biology and biological action of the defensive secretion from a Jamaican millipede. Naturwissenschaften. 1997. 84(4):143-4. [Medline].

  4. Shimizu N, Kuwahara Y, Yakumaru R, Tanabe T. n-Hexyl laurate and fourteen related fatty acid esters: new secretory compounds from the julid millipede, Anaulaciulus sp. J Chem Ecol. 2012 Jan. 38(1):23-8. [Medline].

  5. Hendrickson RG. Millipede exposure. Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2005. 43(3):211-2. [Medline].

  6. Mason GH, Thomson HD, Fergin P, Anderson R. Spot diagnosis. The burning millipede. Med J Aust. 1994 Jun 6. 160(11):718, 726. [Medline].

  7. Radford AJ. Giant millipede burns in Papua New Guinea. P N G Med J. 1976 Sep. 18(3):138-41. [Medline].

  8. Radford AJ. Millipede burns in man. Trop Geogr Med. 1975 Sep. 27(3):279-87. [Medline].

  9. Dar NR, Raza N, Rehman SB. Millipede burn at an unusual site mimicking child abuse in an 8-year-old girl. Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2008 Jun. 47(5):490-2. [Medline].

  10. De Capitani EM, Vieira RJ, Bucaretchi F, Fernandes LC, Toledo AS, Camargo AC. Human accidents involving Rhinocricus spp., a common millipede genus observed in urban areas of Brazil. Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2011 Mar. 49(3):187-90. [Medline].

  11. Verma AK, Bourke B. Millipede burn masquerading as trash foot in a paediatric patient. ANZ J Surg. 2014 May. 84(5):388-90. [Medline].

  12. Hudson BJ, Parsons GA. Giant millipede 'burns' and the eye. Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg. 1997 Mar-Apr. 91(2):183-5. [Medline].

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The desert millipede, Orthoporus ornatus. Photo by Robert Norris, MD.
The desert millipede, Orthoporus ornatus. Photo by Robert Norris, MD.
Millipede contact injury on day 3 following exposure.
 
 
 
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