Close
New

Medscape is available in 5 Language Editions – Choose your Edition here.

 

Caterpillar Envenomation Differential Diagnoses

  • Author: Robert L Norris, MD; Chief Editor: Scott H Plantz, MD, FAAEM  more...
 
Updated: Jul 19, 2016
 
 
 
Contributor Information and Disclosures
Author

Robert L Norris, MD Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center

Robert L Norris, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American College of Emergency Physicians, Society for Academic Emergency Medicine, International Society of Toxinology, American Medical Association, California Medical Association, Wilderness Medical Society

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Specialty Editor Board

John T VanDeVoort, PharmD Regional Director of Pharmacy, Sacred Heart and St Joseph's Hospitals

John T VanDeVoort, PharmD is a member of the following medical societies: American Society of Health-System Pharmacists

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Gino A Farina, MD, FACEP, FAAEM Professor of Emergency Medicine, Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine at Hofstra University; Program Director, Department of Emergency Medicine, Long Island Jewish Medical Center

Gino A Farina, MD, FACEP, FAAEM is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Emergency Medicine, American College of Emergency Physicians, Society for Academic Emergency Medicine

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Chief Editor

Scott H Plantz, MD, FAAEM Associate Clinical Professor of Emergency Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Louisville School of Medicine

Scott H Plantz, MD, FAAEM is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Emergency Medicine

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Additional Contributors

Samuel M Keim, MD, MS Professor and Chair, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Arizona College of Medicine

Samuel M Keim, MD, MS is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Emergency Medicine, American College of Emergency Physicians, American Medical Association, American Public Health Association, Society for Academic Emergency Medicine

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

References
  1. Bonamonte D, Foti C, Vestita M, Angelini G. Skin Reactions to pine processionary caterpillar Thaumetopoea pityocampa Schiff. ScientificWorldJournal. 2013. 2013:867431. [Medline].

  2. Iacobucci G. Oak moth caterpillar that causes rash is spreading in southeast England. BMJ. 2013 May 8. 346:f2964. [Medline].

  3. Wills PJ, Anjana M, Nitin M, Varun R, Sachidanandan P, Jacob TM, et al. Population Explosions of Tiger Moth Lead to Lepidopterism Mimicking Infectious Fever Outbreaks. PLoS One. 2016. 11 (4):e0152787. [Medline].

  4. DuGar B, Sterbank J, Tcheurekdjian H, Hostoffer R. Beware of the caterpillar: Anaphylaxis to the spotted tussock moth caterpillar, Lophocampa maculata. Allergy Rhinol (Providence). 2014 Jul. 5 (2):113-5. [Medline].

  5. Bleriot A, Couret C, Lebranchu P, Le Meur G, Weber M. [Keratitis due to foreign bodies from a processionary caterpillar nest]. J Fr Ophtalmol. 2015 Jan. 38 (1):85-6. [Medline].

  6. Prasad SC, Korah S. Rare Presentation of Ophthalmia Nodosa. Middle East Afr J Ophthalmol. 2015 Oct-Dec. 22 (4):520-1. [Medline].

  7. Casado Verrier E, Carro Rodríguez MA, de la Parte Cancho M, Piñeiro Pérez R. [Systemic reaction after pine processionary caterpillar ingestion. Conservative management?]. Arch Argent Pediatr. 2016 Jun 1. 114 (3):e151-4. [Medline].

  8. MacKinnon JA, Waterman G, Piastro K, Oakes J, Pauze D. Oropharyngeal Edema in an 8-Month-Old Girl after Woolly Bear Caterpillar Exposure. J Emerg Med. 2015 Nov. 49 (5):e147-9. [Medline].

  9. Sánchez MN, Mignone Chagas MA, Casertano SA, Cavagnaro LE, Peichoto ME. [Accidents with caterpillar Lonomia obliqua (Walker, 1855). An emerging problem]. Medicina (B Aires). 2015. 75 (5):328-33. [Medline].

  10. Maggi S, Faulhaber GA. Lonomia obliqua Walker (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae): hemostasis implications. Rev Assoc Med Bras. 2015 May-Jun. 61 (3):263-8. [Medline].

  11. Medeiros DN, Torres HC, Troster EJ. Accident involving a 2-year-old child and Lonomia obliqua venom: clinical and coagulation abnormalities. Rev Bras Hematol Hemoter. 2014 Nov-Dec. 36 (6):445-7. [Medline].

  12. Schmitberger PA, Fernandes TC, Santos RC, de Assis RC, Gomes AP, Siqueira PK, et al. Probable chronic renal failure caused by Lonomia caterpillar envenomation. J Venom Anim Toxins Incl Trop Dis. 2013 Jun 3. 19 (1):14. [Medline].

  13. Lipkova B, Gajdosova E, Kacerik M, Duranova M, Izak MG. Caterpillar setae penetration in an eye: long-term follow-up. Retin Cases Brief Rep. 2013 Summer. 7 (3):252-4. [Medline].

  14. Hossler EW. Caterpillars and moths. Dermatol Ther. 2009 Jul-Aug. 22(4):353-66. [Medline].

Previous
Next
 
Caterpillar envenomations. Puss caterpillar or asp. Photo courtesy of the Arizona Poison and Drug Information Center.
Distinguishing dangerous from harmless caterpillars can be difficult, and handling any caterpillar with bare skin should be avoided. These are harmless tomato hornworm caterpillars (larval form of the five-spotted hawk moth [Manduca quinquemaculata])
 
 
 
All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2016 by WebMD LLC. This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.