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Tinea in Emergency Medicine Follow-up

  • Author: Shari Andrews, MD; Chief Editor: Jeter (Jay) Pritchard Taylor, III, MD  more...
 
Updated: Jan 11, 2016
 

Deterrence/Prevention

Deterrence and prevention of tinea infection includes the following:

  • Practice proper hygiene.
  • Avoid contact with suspicious lesions.
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Complications

Complications of tinea infection include the following:

  • Bacterial superinfection
  • Generalized invasive dermatophyte infection
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Prognosis

Skin tinea infection generally resolves without sequelae within 1-2 weeks of therapy. Hair and nail tinea require 3-6 months of treatment.

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Patient Education

For excellent patient education resources, visit eMedicineHealth's Skin Conditions and Beauty Center. Also, see eMedicineHealth's patient education articles Ringworm on Body and Ringworm on Scalp.

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Contributor Information and Disclosures
Author

Shari Andrews, MD Attending Faculty, Department of Emergency Medicine, North Shore-Long Island Jewish Medical Center, Hofstra University School of Medicine

Shari Andrews, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American College of Emergency Physicians, Society for Academic Emergency Medicine, Emergency Medicine Residents' Association

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Coauthor(s)

Mityanand Ramnarine, MD, FACEP Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine, Program Director, Emergency/Internal Medicine/Critical Care, Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine at Hofstra University; Attending Physician, Department of Emergency Medicine, Long Island Jewish Medical Center

Mityanand Ramnarine, MD, FACEP is a member of the following medical societies: Alpha Omega Alpha, American College of Emergency Physicians, American College of Physicians, American Medical Association

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Specialty Editor Board

Francisco Talavera, PharmD, PhD Adjunct Assistant Professor, University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Pharmacy; Editor-in-Chief, Medscape Drug Reference

Disclosure: Received salary from Medscape for employment. for: Medscape.

Eddy S Lang, MDCM, CCFP(EM), CSPQ Associate Professor, Senior Researcher, Division of Emergency Medicine, Department of Family Medicine, University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine; Assistant Professor, Department of Family Medicine, McGill University Faculty of Medicine, Canada

Eddy S Lang, MDCM, CCFP(EM), CSPQ is a member of the following medical societies: American College of Emergency Physicians, Society for Academic Emergency Medicine, Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Chief Editor

Jeter (Jay) Pritchard Taylor, III, MD Assistant Professor, Department of Surgery, University of South Carolina School of Medicine; Attending Physician, Clinical Instructor, Compliance Officer, Department of Emergency Medicine, Palmetto Richland Hospital

Jeter (Jay) Pritchard Taylor, III, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Emergency Medicine, South Carolina Medical Association, Columbia Medical Society, South Carolina College of Emergency Physicians, American College of Emergency Physicians, American Medical Association, Society for Academic Emergency Medicine

Disclosure: Serve(d) as a director, officer, partner, employee, advisor, consultant or trustee for: Chief Editor for Medscape.

Additional Contributors

Theodore J Gaeta, DO, MPH, FACEP Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College; Vice Chairman and Program Director of Emergency Medicine Residency Program, Department of Emergency Medicine, New York Methodist Hospital; Academic Chair, Adjunct Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, St George's University School of Medicine

Theodore J Gaeta, DO, MPH, FACEP is a member of the following medical societies: American College of Emergency Physicians, New York Academy of Medicine, Society for Academic Emergency Medicine, Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors, Clerkship Directors in Emergency Medicine, Alliance for Clinical Education

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Acknowledgements

Andrew C Miller, MD Fellow, Critical Care Medicine Department, National Institutes of Health; Fellow, Department of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center

Andrew C Miller, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American College of Emergency Physicians and Society of Critical Care Medicine (USA)

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Rashid M Rashid, MD, PhD Medical Director, Department of Hair Transplants and Dermatology, Mosaic Clinic and Morzak Research Initiative

Rashid M Rashid, MD, PhD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Dermatology, Council for Nail Disorders, Houston Dermatological Society, Texas Dermatological Society, and Texas Medical Association

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Mark A Silverberg, MD, MMB, FACEP Assistant Professor, Associate Residency Director, Department of Emergency Medicine, State University of New York Downstate College of Medicine; Consulting Staff, Department of Emergency Medicine, Staten Island University Hospital, Kings County Hospital, University Hospital, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center

Mark A Silverberg, MD, MMB, FACEP is a member of the following medical societies: American College of Emergency Physicians, American Medical Association, Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors, and Society for Academic Emergency Medicine

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

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Wax model of kerionlike tinea barbae. Courtesy of the Museum of the Department of Dermatology, University of Medicine, Wroclaw, Poland.
Tinea capitis; gray patch ringworm. Gray patch refers to the scaling with lack of inflammation, as noted in this patient. Hairs in the involved areas assume a characteristic dull, grayish, discolored appearance and are broken and shorter.
Typical lesions of kerion celsi on the vertex scalp of a young Chinese boy. Note numerous bright yellow purulent areas on skin surface, surrounded by adjacent edematous, erythematous, alopecic areas. Culture from the lesion grew Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Courtesy of Skin Diseases in Chinese by Yau-Chin Lu, MD. Permission granted by Medicine Today Publishing Co, Taipei, Taiwan, 1981.
Annular plaque (tinea corporis).
Tinea favosa of the scalp shows erythematous lesions with pityroid scaling. Some hairs are short and brittle.
Table. Ecology of Common Human Dermatophyte Species. Table reprinted with permission from David Ellis, Bsc (Hons), MSc, PhD, FASM, FRCPA (Hon), Affiliate Associate Professor, The University of Adelaide (http://www.mycology.adelaide.edu.au/mycoses/cutaneous/dermatophytosis).
SpeciesNatural habitatIncidence
E floccosumHumansCommon
T rubrumHumansVery common
T interdigitaleHumansVery common
T tonsuransHumansCommon
Trichophyton violaceumHumansLess common
Trichophyton concentricumHumansRare
Trichophyton schoenleiniiHumansRare
Trichophyton soudanenseHumansRare
Microsporum audouiniiHumansLess common
Microsporum ferrugineumHumansLess common
T mentagrophytesMice, rodentsCommon
Trichophyton equinumHorsesRare
Trichophyton erinaceiHedgehogsRare
Trichophyton verrucosumCattleRare
M canisCatsCommon
Microsporum gypseumSoilCommon
Microsporum nanumSoil/pigsRare
Microsporum cookeiSoilRare
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