Methamphetamine Toxicity Follow-up

Updated: Dec 19, 2016
  • Author: John R Richards, MD, FAAEM; Chief Editor: Jeter (Jay) Pritchard Taylor, III, MD  more...
  • Print
Follow-up

Further Outpatient Care

Referral to a drug treatment center and/or psychiatrist may be indicated. Studies of methamphetamine-dependent patients have found that methamphetamine withdrawal is marked by sleep disruption. Withdrawal symptoms typically resolve over 2 to 3 weeks, and particularly in the first week. Depression typically improves during that time, but anxiety may not. [76, 77]

Next:

Further Inpatient Care

Critical care management may be needed for patients with any of the following:

  • Persistent hypertension
  • Severe rhabdomyolysis
  • Seizures
  • Stroke
  • Coma
  • Hyperthermia
  • Congestive heart failure
  • Acute coronary syndrome
Previous
Next:

Deterrence/Prevention

Methamphetamine addiction is notoriously difficult to treat successfully, as it is difficult to remove the patient from the subculture involved in the production, distribution, and abuse of the drug.

A study by McKetin et al attempted to evaluate the impact of community-based drug treatment on methamphetamine use. Participants were methamphetamine users entering community-based detoxification (n = 112) or residential rehabilitation (n = 248) services and a quasi-control group of methamphetamine users (n = 101) recruited from the community. Compared to the quasi-control group, detoxification did not reduce methamphetamine use at follow-up. Residential rehabilitation showed some efficacy in reducing methamphetamine use, but the decrease was time-limited. [78]

Previous
Next:

Complications

Complications of methamphetamine use include the following:

Previous
Next:

Patient Education

For patient education information, see the Mental Health and Behavior Center, and Substance Abuse Center, as well as Drug Dependence & Abuse, Substance Abuse, Club Drugs, and  Poisoning.

 

Previous