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Syndromic Sensorineural Hearing Loss Follow-up

  • Author: Stephanie A Moody Antonio, MD; Chief Editor: Arlen D Meyers, MD, MBA  more...
 
Updated: Jan 13, 2016
 

Further Outpatient Care

See the list below:

  • Otologist
    • Patients should see an otologist on an annual and as-needed basis. Systematic otologic and audiologic follow-up leads to significant findings in up to 58% of children.
    • Frequent findings include problems with hearing aids, diseases of the external or middle ear, and progressive hearing losses.
  • Audiologist
    • Schedule audiologic reevaluation every 3 months during the first year and every 6 months thereafter.
    • Hearing aids should be calibrated periodically and new molds fitted when necessary.
    • Periodic audiometric testing is necessary to rule out fluctuation or progression of hearing loss.
  • Speech and language pathologist
    • Speech and language therapy is imperative to promote proper language and communication skills.
    • Follow-up must also reassess the accuracy of the initial diagnosis, and appropriate modifications to the habilitative plan must be implemented. Assessment of effectiveness of the educational program is critical to follow-up evaluations.
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Deterrence/Prevention

Instruct patients to avoid ototoxic medications and loud noise exposure without hearing protection.

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Prognosis

With proper amplification, speech and language therapy, and educational programs, a patient with SNHL can fully participate in the totality of adult life, including social activities and work.

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Patient Education

See the list below:

  • Numerous educational methods are currently used for children with hearing impairment. These methods include auditory-oral training, cued speech, and total communication.
    • Auditory-oral training stresses acquisition of speech and language through enhancement of residual hearing. Lipreading skills, along with appropriate amplification, are heavily emphasized.
    • The cued speech approach is a visual-oral system that uses hand cues to supplement information received from lipreading. Hand cues alone are ambiguous, necessitating development of appropriate lipreading skills for language comprehension.
    • Manualism is a system of communication that stresses use of the manual alphabet (fingerspelling) and sign language for communication. American Sign Language (Ameslan) has been the language of the deaf population in the United States for more than a century. Ameslan does not follow English grammatical rules and has its own semantic system. Signed English uses syntax compatible with English grammar, giving people who are deaf knowledge of proper structure and usage of English.
    • The total communication method emphasizes manual, oral, and aural modes of communication. This method urges early use of residual hearing while accepting sign language as a normal means of communication. Speech and use of spontaneous expression are also encouraged.
  • Educators, individuals with hearing impairment, and parents still disagree on the most advantageous method of communication. The method selected has a profound influence on a child's ability to someday fully participate in the totality of adult life, including social activities and work. No single educational program is correct for all children with hearing impairment, but, rather, decisions should be individualized for each child.
  • For excellent patient education resources, visit eMedicineHealth's Ear, Nose, and Throat Center. Also, see eMedicineHealth's patient education article Hearing Loss.
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Contributor Information and Disclosures
Author

Stephanie A Moody Antonio, MD Associate Professor, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Eastern Virginia Medical School

Stephanie A Moody Antonio, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Virginia Society of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, American Neurotology Society, American Medical Association

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Coauthor(s)

Barry Strasnick, MD, FACS Chairman, Professor, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Eastern Virginia Medical School

Barry Strasnick, MD, FACS is a member of the following medical societies: Alpha Omega Alpha, American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, American Auditory Society, American College of Surgeons, American Medical Association, American Tinnitus Association, Ear Foundation Alumni Society, Norfolk Academy of Medicine, North American Skull Base Society, Society of University Otolaryngologists-Head and Neck Surgeons, Vestibular Disorders Association, Virginia Society of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Specialty Editor Board

Francisco Talavera, PharmD, PhD Adjunct Assistant Professor, University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Pharmacy; Editor-in-Chief, Medscape Drug Reference

Disclosure: Received salary from Medscape for employment. for: Medscape.

Ted L Tewfik, MD Professor of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Professor of Pediatric Surgery, McGill University Faculty of Medicine; Senior Staff, Montreal Children's Hospital, Montreal General Hospital, and Royal Victoria Hospital

Ted L Tewfik, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Society of Pediatric Otolaryngology, Canadian Society of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Chief Editor

Arlen D Meyers, MD, MBA Professor of Otolaryngology, Dentistry, and Engineering, University of Colorado School of Medicine

Arlen D Meyers, MD, MBA is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, American Head and Neck Society

Disclosure: Serve(d) as a director, officer, partner, employee, advisor, consultant or trustee for: Cerescan;RxRevu;SymbiaAllergySolutions<br/>Received income in an amount equal to or greater than $250 from: Symbia<br/>Received from Allergy Solutions, Inc for board membership; Received honoraria from RxRevu for chief medical editor; Received salary from Medvoy for founder and president; Received consulting fee from Corvectra for senior medical advisor; Received ownership interest from Cerescan for consulting; Received consulting fee from Essiahealth for advisor; Received consulting fee from Carespan for advisor; Received consulting fee from Covidien for consulting.

Additional Contributors

B Viswanatha, DO, MBBS, PhD, MS, FACS Professor of Otolaryngology (ENT), Sri Venkateshwara ENT Institute, Victoria Hospital, Bangalore Medical College and Research Institute, India

B Viswanatha, DO, MBBS, PhD, MS, FACS is a member of the following medical societies: Indian Medical Association, Indian Society of Otology, Association of Otolaryngologists of India

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

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