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Submandibular Sialadenitis/Sialadenosis Treatment & Management

  • Author: Adi Yoskovitch, MD, MSc; Chief Editor: Arlen D Meyers, MD, MBA  more...
 
Updated: May 06, 2016
 

Medical Care

Management of submandibular sialadenitis and sialadenosis involves a wide range of approaches, from conservative medical management to more aggressive surgical intervention.

One management scheme is as follows:

  • Acute sialadenitis
    • Medical management - Hydration, antibiotics (oral versus parenteral), warm compresses and massage, sialogogues
    • Surgical management - Consideration of incision and drainage versus excision of the gland in cases refractory to antibiotics, incision and drainage with abscess formation, gland excision in cases of recurrent acute sialadenitis
  • Salivary calculi
    • Medical management - Hydration, compression and massage, antibiotics for the infected gland
    • Surgical management - Duct cannulation with stone removal, gland excision in recurrent case
  • Sjögren disease
    • Medical management - Hydration, dental hygiene, rheumatology and dental referral
    • Surgical management - Gland excision not usually needed unless recurrent acute sialadenitis
  • Sialadenosis
    • Medical management - Treatment of underlying cause
    • Surgical management - Not indicated

A prospective study by Choi et al indicated that following salivary stimulation therapy, patients with radioactive iodine (RAI)-induced sialadenitis may undergo a subjective reduction in symptoms but will not experience significant improvement in salivary gland function. The study involved 61 patients who were diagnosed with chronic RAI-induced sialadenitis following thyroidectomy and RAI treatment. After salivary stimulation with pilocarpine, significant improvement was seen in the patients’ subjective symptom scores; however, salivary flow rates and salivary gland scintigraphy parameters, as measured in the parotid and submandibular glands, were not significantly different from their prestimulation values.[8]

Medical management of submandibular sialadenitis and sialadenosis centers on eliminating the causative factor.

  • Acute sialadenitis
    • In cases of acute sialadenitis, adequate hydration should be ensured and electrolyte imbalances corrected.
    • Patients are most often treated on an outpatient basis, with the administration of a single dose of parenteral antibiotics in an emergency department, followed by oral antibiotics for a period of 7-10 days. Clindamycin (900 mg IV q8h or 300 mg PO q8h) is an excellent choice and provides good coverage against typical organisms.
    • Patients who exhibit significant morbidity, are significantly dehydrated, or are septic should be admitted to hospital. In this latter group of patients, CT scanning of the area should be performed. If a large abscess is noted, incision and drainage should be considered. Small abscesses typically respond to conservative methods.
    • In cases refractory to antibiotics, viral and atypical bacterial causes should be considered.
  • Sialolithiasis
    • Patients with sialolithiasis should be initially treated with hydration, warm compresses, and gland massage.
    • Antibiotics are indicated in patients exhibiting infection.
  • Sjögren disease
    • In those patients with Sjögren disease, hydration and prevention of complications should be undertaken.
    • Dental hygiene should be strictly maintained in order to prevent carries, and dental and rheumatology consults should be sought. Gland excision is rarely indicated.
  • Sialadenosis: Sialadenosis should be managed expectantly. Treatment should be directed towards managing the underlying problem and achieving homeostasis. Gland excision is not indicated.
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Surgical Care

Acute sialadenitis

Patients who exhibit significant morbidity, are significantly dehydrated, or are septic should be admitted to hospital. In this latter group of patients, CT scanning of the area should be performed. If a large abscess is noted, incision and drainage should be considered. Small abscesses typically respond to conservative methods.

In patients with recurrent acute attacks, gland excision during a period of quiescence should be considered. Serial CT scanning is often useful.

Endoscopic management of sialadenitis frequently obviates the need for gland removal. Results follow a learning curve.[9]

Chronic sialadenitis

A retrospective study described sialendoscopy as a safe and effective means of treating children with recurrent or chronic sialadenitis. Semensohn et al examined the medical records of 12 pediatric patients who underwent diagnostic and therapeutic sialendoscopy for recurrent parotitis (nine patients) or chronic submandibular sialadenitis (three patients). During follow-up, which averaged 16.5 months, only one patient needed additional surgery (salvage parotidectomy), due to repeated recurrences.[10]

Sialolithiasis

In patients with calculi in proximity of the opening of the Wharton duct, the duct can be cannulated, dilated, and the stone removed via a transoral approach.

Patients with deep intraparenchymal stones or multiple stones should have their glands excised on an elective basis. Ultrasonic lithotripsy is rarely effective and is not offered at the authors' institution.

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Contributor Information and Disclosures
Author

Adi Yoskovitch, MD, MSc Chief, Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Fleury Hospital, Canada

Adi Yoskovitch, MD, MSc is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Canadian Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Specialty Editor Board

Francisco Talavera, PharmD, PhD Adjunct Assistant Professor, University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Pharmacy; Editor-in-Chief, Medscape Drug Reference

Disclosure: Received salary from Medscape for employment. for: Medscape.

Dominique Dorion, MD, MSc, FRCSC, FACS Deputy Dean and Associate Dean of Resources, Professor of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Université de Sherbrooke, Canada

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Chief Editor

Arlen D Meyers, MD, MBA Professor of Otolaryngology, Dentistry, and Engineering, University of Colorado School of Medicine

Arlen D Meyers, MD, MBA is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, American Head and Neck Society

Disclosure: Serve(d) as a director, officer, partner, employee, advisor, consultant or trustee for: Cerescan;RxRevu;SymbiaAllergySolutions<br/>Received income in an amount equal to or greater than $250 from: Symbia<br/>Received from Allergy Solutions, Inc for board membership; Received honoraria from RxRevu for chief medical editor; Received salary from Medvoy for founder and president; Received consulting fee from Corvectra for senior medical advisor; Received ownership interest from Cerescan for consulting; Received consulting fee from Essiahealth for advisor; Received consulting fee from Carespan for advisor; Received consulting fee from Covidien for consulting.

Additional Contributors

Richard V Smith, MD Director of Clinical Affairs, Associate Professor, Department of Otolaryngology, Division of Head and Neck Surgery, Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center

Richard V Smith, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, American College of Surgeons, American Head and Neck Society, The Triological Society, American Medical Association, American Medical Student Association/Foundation, Medical Society of the District of Columbia, New York Academy of Medicine, Vermont Medical Society

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

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Submandibular calculus.
Sialogram with stenosis secondary to chronic sialadenosis.
Submandibular abscess and associated Ludwig angina.
Submandibular neoplasm.
 
 
 
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