Close
New

Medscape is available in 5 Language Editions – Choose your Edition here.

 

Pediatric Acropustulosis Medication

  • Author: Christine Shanahan; Chief Editor: Dirk M Elston, MD  more...
 
Updated: Mar 29, 2016
 

Medication Summary

High-potency topical steroids (class 1 and 2) have been successfully used for control of pruritus. Oral antihistamines may reduce pruritus and aid in sleep for irritable and extremely uncomfortable children. Extremely symptomatic children may be treated with dapsone at a dose of 1-2 mg/kg/day.

Next

Glucocorticoids, topical

Class Summary

These agents elicit anti-inflammatory properties. They modify the body's immune response to diverse stimuli. These drugs provide symptomatic relief of pruritus.

Betamethasone dipropionate (Diprosone, Maxivate)

 

Betamethasone dipropionate is available as a topical steroid cream or ointment. It decreases inflammation by suppressing the migration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes and reversing capillary permeability.

Previous
Next

Antibiotics

Class Summary

Dapsone is a diaminodiphenylsulfone antibiotic that may be used as anti-inflammatory agent.

Dapsone (Avlosulfon)

 

Dapsone is a sulfone antibiotic used mainly for the treatment of leprosy and dermatitis herpetiformis. It elicits antineutrophil and anti-inflammatory properties.

Previous
Next

Antihistamines, 1st Generation

Class Summary

Antihistamines provide symptomatic relief of pruritus.

Diphenhydramine (Alka-Seltzer Plus Allergy, Benadryl, Benadryl Allergy Dye-Free LiquiGels)

 

Diphenhydramine is an antihistamine used for pruritus and allergic reactions.

Hydroxyzine (Vistaril)

 

Hydroxyzine is an antihistamine with antipruritic, anxiolytic, and mild sedative effects. It antagonizes H1 receptors in the periphery, and it may suppress histamine activity in the subcortical region of the CNS. Syrup is available as 10 mg/5 mL.

Previous
 
 
Contributor Information and Disclosures
Author

Christine Shanahan University of Virginia School of Medicine

Christine Shanahan is a member of the following medical societies: American Telemedicine Association, Medical Society of Virginia

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Coauthor(s)

Barbara B Wilson, MD Edward P Cawley Associate Professor, Department of Dermatology, University of Virginia School of Medicine

Barbara B Wilson, MD is a member of the following medical societies: Alpha Omega Alpha, Medical Society of Virginia, Sigma Xi, American Academy of Dermatology

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Specialty Editor Board

Mary L Windle, PharmD Adjunct Associate Professor, University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Pharmacy; Editor-in-Chief, Medscape Drug Reference

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Robert A Schwartz, MD, MPH Professor and Head of Dermatology, Professor of Pathology, Pediatrics, Medicine, and Preventive Medicine and Community Health, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School; Visiting Professor, Rutgers University School of Public Affairs and Administration

Robert A Schwartz, MD, MPH is a member of the following medical societies: Alpha Omega Alpha, New York Academy of Medicine, American Academy of Dermatology, American College of Physicians, Sigma Xi

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Chief Editor

Dirk M Elston, MD Professor and Chairman, Department of Dermatology and Dermatologic Surgery, Medical University of South Carolina College of Medicine

Dirk M Elston, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Dermatology

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Additional Contributors

Kevin P Connelly, DO Clinical Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Division of General Pediatrics and Emergency Care, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine; Medical Director, Paws for Health Pet Visitation Program of the Richmond SPCA; Pediatric Emergency Physician, Emergency Consultants Inc, Chippenham Medical Center

Kevin P Connelly, DO is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Pediatrics, American College of Osteopathic Pediatricians, American Osteopathic Association

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Acknowledgements

Howard Pride, MD Associate Physician, Departments of Pediatrics and Dermatology, Geisinger Medical Center

Howard Pride is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Dermatology and Society for Pediatric Dermatology

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

References
  1. Posso-De Los Rios CJ, Pope E. New insights into pustular dermatoses in pediatric patients. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2013 Dec 30. [Medline].

  2. Dromy R, Raz A, Metzker A. Infantile acropustulosis. Pediatr Dermatol. 1991 Dec. 8(4):284-7. [Medline].

  3. Good LM, Good TJ, High WA. Infantile acropustulosis in internationally adopted children. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2011 Oct. 65 (4):763-71. [Medline].

  4. Tucker M, Ramolia P, Wells MJ. JAAD Grand Rounds. Neonate with extensive papulovesicles. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2013 May. 68 (5):877-9. [Medline].

  5. Vicente J, Espana A, Idoate M, et al. Are eosinophilic pustular folliculitis of infancy and infantile acropustulosis the same entity?. Br J Dermatol. 1996 Nov. 135(5):807-9. [Medline].

  6. Braun-Falco M, Stachowitz S, Schnopp C, et al. Infantile acropustulosis successfully controlled with topical corticosteroids under damp tubular retention bandages. Acta Derm Venereol. 2001 May. 81(2):140-1. [Medline].

  7. Humeau S, Bureau B, Litoux P, Stalder JF. Infantile acropustulosis in six immigrant children. Pediatr Dermatol. 1995 Sep. 12(3):211-4. [Medline].

  8. Silverberg NB. Infantile Acropustulosis. Silverberg NB, Durán-McKinster C, Tay YK, eds. Pediatric Skin of Color. New York, NY: Springer; 2015. 4(36): 323-25.

  9. Kimura M, Higuchi T, Yoshida M. Infantile acropustulosis treated successfully with topical maxacalcitol. Acta Derm Venereol. 2011 May. 91 (3):363-4. [Medline].

  10. Porriño-Bustamante ML, Sánchez-López J, Aneiros-Fernández J, Burkhardt P, Naranjo-Sintes R. Recurrent pustules on an infant's scalp with neonatal onset. Int J Dermatol. 2015 Aug 12. [Medline].

  11. Zhang X, Hunzelmann N, Tantcheva-Poor I. Recurrent sterile pustules and papules in a 7-month-old infant. Pediatr Dermatol. 2013 Sep-Oct. 30 (5):621. [Medline].

  12. Ghosh S. Neonatal pustular dermatosis: an overview. Indian J Dermatol. 2015 Mar-Apr. 60 (2):211. [Medline].

 
Previous
Next
 
Lateral and plantar foot exhibiting acropustulosis. A combination of intact acute vesicles and brownish hyperpigmentation of old vesicles is present.
Pustules on the dorsal hands of a 1 year old child.
Scattered new and resolving pustules on the dorsal feet.
 
 
 
All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2016 by WebMD LLC. This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.