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Pediatric Milia Workup

  • Author: Nicholas V Nguyen, MD; Chief Editor: Dirk M Elston, MD  more...
 
Updated: Apr 08, 2016
 

Laboratory Studies

Milia are easily diagnosed on clinical findings alone. Histologic examination reveals small cysts lined by stratified squamous epithelium and central keratinous material.[12] Persistent and widely distributed milia may warrant investigation for an underlying genodermatosis, particularly when other anomalies are present.

 
 
Contributor Information and Disclosures
Author

Nicholas V Nguyen, MD Resident Physician, Department of Dermatology, Children's Hospital Colorado, Denver Health Medical Center, University of Colorado Hospital, VA Eastern Colorado

Nicholas V Nguyen, MD is a member of the following medical societies: Alpha Omega Alpha, American Academy of Dermatology, International Society of Dermatology, Society for Pediatric Dermatology

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Coauthor(s)

Tracy Funk, MD Fellow in Pediatric Dermatology, Department of Dermatology, The Children’s Hospital Colorado

Tracy Funk, MD is a member of the following medical societies: Alpha Omega Alpha, American Academy of Dermatology, American Academy of Pediatrics, Society for Pediatric Dermatology, Women's Dermatologic Society

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Specialty Editor Board

Mary L Windle, PharmD Adjunct Associate Professor, University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Pharmacy; Editor-in-Chief, Medscape Drug Reference

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Robert A Schwartz, MD, MPH Professor and Head of Dermatology, Professor of Pathology, Pediatrics, Medicine, and Preventive Medicine and Community Health, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School; Visiting Professor, Rutgers University School of Public Affairs and Administration

Robert A Schwartz, MD, MPH is a member of the following medical societies: Alpha Omega Alpha, New York Academy of Medicine, American Academy of Dermatology, American College of Physicians, Sigma Xi

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Chief Editor

Dirk M Elston, MD Professor and Chairman, Department of Dermatology and Dermatologic Surgery, Medical University of South Carolina College of Medicine

Dirk M Elston, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Dermatology

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Additional Contributors

Kevin P Connelly, DO Clinical Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Division of General Pediatrics and Emergency Care, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine; Medical Director, Paws for Health Pet Visitation Program of the Richmond SPCA; Pediatric Emergency Physician, Emergency Consultants Inc, Chippenham Medical Center

Kevin P Connelly, DO is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Pediatrics, American College of Osteopathic Pediatricians, American Osteopathic Association

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Acknowledgements

Ruchir Agrawal, MD Chief, Allergy and Immunology, Aurora Sheboygan Clinic

Ruchir Agrawal, MD, is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology, American Academy of Pediatrics, American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, and American Medical Association

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

References
  1. Berk DR, Bayliss SJ. Milia: a review and classification. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2008 Dec. 59(6):1050-63. [Medline].

  2. Sachdeva M, Kaur S, Nagpal M, Dewan SP. Cutaneous lesions in new born. Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol. 2002 Nov-Dec. 68(6):334-7. [Medline].

  3. Langley RG, Walsh NM, Ross JB. Multiple eruptive milia: report of a case, review of the literature, and a classification. J Am Acad Dermatol. 1997 Aug. 37(2 Pt 2):353-6. [Medline].

  4. Southwick GJ, Schwartz RA. The basal cell nevus syndrome: disasters occurring among a series of 36 patients. Cancer. 1979 Dec. 44(6):2294-305. [Medline].

  5. Michaelsson G, Olsson E, Westermark P. The Rombo syndrome: a familial disorder with vermiculate atrophoderma, milia, hypotrichosis, trichoepitheliomas, basal cell carcinomas and peripheral vasodilation with cyanosis. Acta Derm Venereol. 1981. 61(6):497-503. [Medline].

  6. Rasmussen JE. A syndrome of trichoepitheliomas, milia, and cylindromas. Arch Dermatol. 1975 May. 111(5):610-4. [Medline].

  7. Su WP, Chun SI, Hammond DE, Gordon H. Pachyonychia congenita: a clinical study of 12 cases and review of the literature. Pediatr Dermatol. 1990 Mar. 7(1):33-8. [Medline].

  8. Bergman R, Schein-Goldshmid R, Hochberg Z, Ben-Izhak O, Sprecher E. The alopecias associated with vitamin D-dependent rickets type IIA and with hairless gene mutations: a comparative clinical, histologic, and immunohistochemical study. Arch Dermatol. 2005 Mar. 141(3):343-51. [Medline].

  9. Tsuji T, Kadoya A, Tanaka R, Kono T, Hamada T. Milia induced by corticosteroids. Arch Dermatol. 1986 Feb. 122(2):139-40. [Medline].

  10. Epstein W, Klingman AM. The pathogenesis of milia and benign tumors of the skin. J Invest Dermatol. 1956 Jan. 26(1):1-11. [Medline].

  11. Honda Y, Egawa K, Baba Y, Ono T. Sweat duct milia--immunohistological analysis of structure and three-dimensional reconstruction. Arch Dermatol Res. 1996 Mar. 288(3):133-9. [Medline].

  12. Weedon D. Cutaneous infiltrates—non-lymphoid. Weedon D, ed. Weedon’s skin pathology. New York: Churchill Livingstone; 2010.

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