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Microvillus Inclusion Disease Follow-up

  • Author: Stefano Guandalini, MD; Chief Editor: Carmen Cuffari, MD  more...
 
Updated: Jul 17, 2015
 

Complications

Acute episodes of dehydration and metabolic decompensation are common complications. Neurological and psychological symptoms (eg, developmental delay) may be related to the hypovolemia-related temporary ischemia.[19] Impaired renal function and nephrocalcinosis may also occur. Infectious complications of the central line that result in sepsis are the most frequent causes of death, followed by liver failure.[12]

Multiple hepatic adenomas have recently been described in a child with microvillus inclusion disease.[13]

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Prognosis

The prognosis is poor. If patients are untreated, the disease is rapidly fatal because of dehydration and malnutrition.

If patients are treated with total parenteral nutrition (TPN), their prognosis entirely depends on the complications of this approach. These complications include cholestasis with subsequent liver damage leading to cirrhosis, catheter-related sepsis due to infection with bacterial or fungal agents, and progressive lack of vascular access.

The limited experience accumulated in a few centers worldwide reflects an overall survival rate of approximately 50% at 5 years after small-bowel transplantation; this is a much better outcome than is seen with other indications for intestinal transplantation.[9]

Children with late-onset congenital microvillous atrophy usually have less severe diarrhea; with age they can reduce the requirements of TPN to 1-2 per week.

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Contributor Information and Disclosures
Author

Stefano Guandalini, MD Founder and Medical Director, Celiac Disease Center, Chief, Section of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Department of Pediatrics, University of Chicago Medical Center; Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Section of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, University of Chicago Division of the Biological Sciences, The Pritzker School of Medicine

Stefano Guandalini, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Gastroenterological Association, North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology & Nutrition, North American Society for the Study of Celiac Disease

Disclosure: Received consulting fee from AbbVie for consulting.

Coauthor(s)

Agostino Nocerino, MD, PhD Chief of Pediatric Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Udine, Italy

Agostino Nocerino, MD, PhD is a member of the following medical societies: American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Italian Society of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Italian Society of Pediatric Emergency and Urgent Care Medicine, Italian Society of Pediatrics

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Specialty Editor Board

Mary L Windle, PharmD Adjunct Associate Professor, University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Pharmacy; Editor-in-Chief, Medscape Drug Reference

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Chief Editor

Carmen Cuffari, MD Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Gastroenterology/Nutrition, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Carmen Cuffari, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American College of Gastroenterology, American Gastroenterological Association, North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada

Disclosure: Received honoraria from Prometheus Laboratories for speaking and teaching; Received honoraria from Abbott Nutritionals for speaking and teaching.

Additional Contributors

Chris A Liacouras, MD Director of Pediatric Endoscopy, Division of Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia; Associate Professor of Pediatrics, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Chris A Liacouras, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Gastroenterological Association

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

References
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