Patau Syndrome Follow-up

Updated: Dec 24, 2015
  • Author: Robert G Best, PhD, FACMG; Chief Editor: Luis O Rohena, MD, FAAP, FACMG  more...
  • Print
Follow-up

Further Outpatient Care

See the list below:

  • Provide surviving children with Patau syndrome the same care other children receive, including visual assessments, hearing evaluations by age 6-8 months, and immunizations. [8] Treat health problems according to severity and always in the best interests of the child.
  • Specific growth charts are available for monitoring growth of children with Patau syndrome.
  • Continue monitoring for apneic episodes.
  • Babies with Patau syndrome are notably irritable.
  • Older children are at risk of developing scoliosis.
  • At least one older patient has developed hepatoblastoma. [9]
Next:

Inpatient & Outpatient Medications

See the list below:

  • Prior to dental procedures, administer prophylactic antibiotics for children with cardiac anomalies.
Previous
Next:

Deterrence/Prevention

See the list below:

  • In each subsequent pregnancy, offer a prenatal diagnostic study to women who have had a pregnancy with an autosomal aneuploidy, including trisomy 13, 18, or 21. Such studies are also indicated when either parent is known to carry structural chromosome abnormalities involving chromosome 13. These recommendations are based on an empiric recurrence of about 1%.
Previous
Next:

Prognosis

See the list below:

  • Prognosis is generally quite poor for the neonate identified with Patau syndrome. Median survival is only 2.5 days; 82% die within 1 month, and 95% die within 6 months.
Previous
Next:

Patient Education

See the list below:

  • Although those who survive Patau syndrome have low educational potential, increased stimulation and interaction are appropriate to maximize developmental potential.
  • Inform parents about the Support Organization for Trisomy 18, 13, and Related Disorders (SOFT). This organization, with state and local chapters throughout the country, is a good resource for information and psychosocial support for parents and families dealing with this difficult disorder.
  • Living With Trisomy 13 is another organization with information for families and physicians.
Previous