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Pediatric Pyelonephritis Differential Diagnoses

  • Author: Patrick B Hinfey, MD; Chief Editor: Russell W Steele, MD  more...
 
Updated: Sep 30, 2015
 
 

Diagnostic Considerations

UTI and pyelonephritis must be considered in young pediatric patients with fever and/or nonspecific symptoms so that this fairly common diagnosis is not overlooked.Identification and treatment of acute pyelonephritis in the first 5-7 days significantly decreases the risk of renal scarring.

Conditions to be considered in the differential diagnosis of pyelonephritis include the following:

  • Concurrent pregnancy
  • Anatomic abnormalities of the urinary tract
  • Vesicoureteral reflux
  • Ureteropelvic junction obstruction
  • Posterior urethral valves
  • Ureterocele
  • Vaginitis
  • Fever of unknown origin
  • Pelvic inflammatory disease
  • Xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis

Differential Diagnoses

 
 
Contributor Information and Disclosures
Author

Patrick B Hinfey, MD Emergency Medicine Residency Director, Department of Emergency Medicine, Newark Beth Israel Medical Center; Clinical Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine, New York College of Osteopathic Medicine

Patrick B Hinfey, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Emergency Medicine, Wilderness Medical Society, American College of Emergency Physicians, Society for Academic Emergency Medicine

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Chief Editor

Russell W Steele, MD Clinical Professor, Tulane University School of Medicine; Staff Physician, Ochsner Clinic Foundation

Russell W Steele, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Pediatrics, American Association of Immunologists, American Pediatric Society, American Society for Microbiology, Infectious Diseases Society of America, Louisiana State Medical Society, Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society, Society for Pediatric Research, Southern Medical Association

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Acknowledgements

Stephen C Aronoff, MD Waldo E Nelson Chair and Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Temple University School of Medicine

Stephen C Aronoff, MD is a member of the following medical societies: Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society and Society for Pediatric Research

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Leslie L Barton, MD Professor Emerita of Pediatrics, University of Arizona College of Medicine

Leslie L Barton, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Pediatrics, Association of Pediatric Program Directors, Infectious Diseases Society of America, and Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Andrea CS McCoy, MD Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Temple University School of Medicine; Chief Medical Officer, Jeanes Hospital

Andrea CS McCoy, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Pediatrics

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Mary L Windle, PharmD Adjunct Associate Professor, University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Pharmacy; Editor-in-Chief, Medscape Drug Reference

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

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