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Pediatric Periventricular Leukomalacia Treatment & Management

  • Author: Terence Zach, MD; Chief Editor: Ted Rosenkrantz, MD  more...
 
Updated: Jan 15, 2015
 

Medical Care

No medical treatment is currently available. Free radical scavengers are being investigated to determine if they have a role in preventing oligodendrocyte injury in periventricular leukomalacia (PVL).

Consultations

Infants with periventricular leukomalacia require close neurodevelopmental follow-up after discharge from the hospital. Potential consultants include pediatricians, developmental specialists, neurologists, and occupational and physical therapists.

 
 
Contributor Information and Disclosures
Author

Terence Zach, MD Department Chair, Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Section of Newborn Medicine, Creighton University School of Medicine

Terence Zach, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Pediatrics

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Coauthor(s)

Harold A Kaftan, MD Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Creighton University School of Medicine; Medical Director, Newborn Intensive Care Unit, Creighton University Medical Center; Staff Neonatologist, Joint Division of Newborn Medicine, Creighton University, University of Nebraska Medical Center

Harold A Kaftan, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Pediatrics

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Specialty Editor Board

Mary L Windle, PharmD Adjunct Associate Professor, University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Pharmacy; Editor-in-Chief, Medscape Drug Reference

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Arun K Pramanik, MD, MBBS Professor of Pediatrics, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center

Arun K Pramanik, MD, MBBS is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Pediatrics, American Thoracic Society, National Perinatal Association, Southern Society for Pediatric Research

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Chief Editor

Ted Rosenkrantz, MD Professor, Departments of Pediatrics and Obstetrics/Gynecology, Division of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, University of Connecticut School of Medicine

Ted Rosenkrantz, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Pediatrics, American Pediatric Society, Eastern Society for Pediatric Research, American Medical Association, Connecticut State Medical Society, Society for Pediatric Research

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Additional Contributors

Scott S MacGilvray, MD Clinical Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, The Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University

Scott S MacGilvray, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Pediatrics

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Acknowledgements

James C Brown, MD Co-Director of Pediatric Radiology, Assistant Professor, Department of Radiology, Creighton University School of Medicine

James C Brown, MD is a member of the following medical societies: American Academy of Pediatrics, American College of Radiology, American Medical Association, and Nebraska Medical Association

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

References
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Cranial ultrasound, coronal view, in 1-week-old premature infant. The periventricular echotexture is abnormally increased (greater than or equal to that of the choroid plexus), which is consistent with the early changes of periventricular leukomalacia (PVL). Courtesy of Matthew Omojola, MD.
Cranial ultrasound, coronal view, in 1-week-old premature infant without periventricular leukomalacia (PVL). The periventricular echotexture is normal. Compare with the previous image. Courtesy of Matthew Omojola, MD.
Cranial ultrasound, coronal view, in a 3-week-old premature infant. Multiple bilateral periventricular cysts are typical of this stage of periventricular leukomalacia (PVL). Courtesy of Matthew Omojola, MD.
Cranial ultrasound, sagittal view, in 3-week-old premature infant. Multiple periventricular cysts are typical of this stage of periventricular leukomalacia (PVL). Courtesy of Matthew Omojola, MD.
Cranial CT scan, axial image, in a 5-week-old premature infant with periventricular leukomalacia (PVL). The ventricular margins are irregular, which is consistent with incorporation of the periventricular cysts of PVL. Mild ventriculomegaly and loss of the periventricular white matter is observed. Courtesy of Matthew Omojola, MD.
Cranial CT scan, axial image, in 14-month-old with periventricular leukomalacia (PVL). Ventriculomegaly is limited to the lateral ventricles secondary to diffuse loss of periventricular white matter. Courtesy of Matthew Omojola, MD.
Cranial MRI, T1-weighted axial image, in an 18-month-old with periventricular leukomalacia (PVL). The lateral ventricles are enlarged without hydrocephalus. The periventricular white matter is diminished. Courtesy of Matthew Omojola, MD.
Cranial MRI, T2-weighted axial image, in an 18-month-old with periventricular leukomalacia (PVL). Again, enlarged ventricles and loss of white matter are demonstrated. Also noted is the abnormal increased signal in the periventricular regions on this T2-weighted image. Courtesy of Matthew Omojola, MD.
Cranial MRI, sagittal T1-weighted image in the midline, in an 18-month-old with periventricular leukomalacia (PVL). Hypoplasia of the corpus callosum is present and is most evident, involving the body. Courtesy of Matthew Omojola, MD.
 
 
 
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