Pediatric Tracheomalacia Medication

Updated: Jul 30, 2018
  • Author: Emily Concepcion, DO; Chief Editor: Girish D Sharma, MD, FCCP, FAAP  more...
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Medication

Medication Summary

After the diagnosis of tracheomalacia is made, the most effective and safest treatment is the passage of time. Bronchodilators (eg, albuterol) usually do not help and may worsen tracheomalacia in some infants. The tone of the smooth muscle presumably stents the airway in some babies. Administering a beta-agonist relaxes these muscles and may worsen airway collapse.

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Glucocorticoids

Class Summary

These agents have anti-inflammatory properties and cause profound and varied metabolic effects. They modify the body's immune response to diverse stimuli.

Babies who have respiratory difficulties during a concomitant upper respiratory tract infection may respond favorably to systemic corticosteroids. If the baby is noisier than usual but acting and eating normally, do not use medications.

Prednisolone (Orapred, Prelone, Pediapred)

May decrease inflammation by reversing increased capillary permeability and suppressing polymorphonuclear (PMN) activity. Available in tab and syr; prednisolone syr tastes better than prednisone syr.

Prednisone (Deltasone, Meticorten, Orasone)

May decrease inflammation by reversing increased capillary permeability and suppressing PMN activity.

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