Pseudocyst of the Auricle Clinical Presentation

Updated: Nov 07, 2019
  • Author: William P Baugh, MD; Chief Editor: Dirk M Elston, MD  more...
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Presentation

History

A pseudocyst manifests as a painless swelling on the lateral or anterior surface of the pinna, developing over a period of 4-12 weeks. The pseudocyst may appear randomly or after repeated minor trauma. [12] Frequent traumas that may accompany the clinical history include rubbing, ear pulling, sleeping on hard pillows, minor sports injuries, or wearing of a motorcycle helmet or earphones. Neurological diseases have also been shown to promote the occurrence of pseudocysts of the auricle. [2] It has also been associated with cases of pruritic skin or systemic diseases, including atopic dermatitis and lymphomas. [9, 11]

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Physical Examination

Physical examination findings include swelling and tenderness of the lateral and/or anterior part of the ear. [2] A pseudocyst is a noninflammatory, asymptomatic swelling on the lateral or anterior surface of the pinna, usually in the scaphoid or triangular fossa. They range from 1-5 cm in diameter and contain clear or yellowish viscous fluid, with a consistency similar to that of olive oil. Note the image below.

Asymptomatic nodule on the left ear. Asymptomatic nodule on the left ear.
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