Cherry Hemangioma

Updated: Mar 22, 2016
  • Author: Clarence William Brown, Jr, MD, FAAD; Chief Editor: Dirk M Elston, MD  more...
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Overview

Background

Cherry hemangiomas are the most common cutaneous vascular proliferations. They are often widespread and appear as tiny cherry-red papules or macules. Longstanding lesions enlarge slowly over time and take on the appearance of a dome topped with cherry-red to deep-purple papules.

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Pathophysiology

Involvement of cherry hemangiomas is limited to the skin. These benign lesions are formed by a proliferation of dilated venules.

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Epidemiology

Frequency

Frequency of cherry hemangiomas increases with age in both sexes and all races. The incidence of cherry angiomas is uniform across all races, but individual lesions are most noticeable in pale-skinned individuals.

Race

Cherry hemangiomas are found in individuals of all races and ethnic backgrounds.

Sex

No distinction can be made on the basis of sex.

Age

Cherry hemangiomas occur more frequently with increasing age. In the past, the lesions often were referred to as senile angiomas.

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