Atypical Mycobacterial Diseases Follow-up

Updated: Feb 16, 2016
  • Author: Noah S Scheinfeld, JD, MD, FAAD; Chief Editor: Dirk M Elston, MD  more...
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Follow-up

Further Outpatient Care

Patients sometimes must take prolonged courses of antibiotics and must be aware of this.

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Further Inpatient Care

Patients with atypical mycobacteria can be treated as outpatients after appropriate surgery has been performed.

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Inpatient & Outpatient Medications

Inpatient and outpatient medications include appropriate antibiotics based on sensitivities.

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Deterrence/Prevention

Patients should avoid contaminant material and injections with contaminated materials. Patients should also avoid contaminated water.

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Complications

Scarring and nerve damage can occur from long-standing untreated infections.

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Prognosis

The prognosis is good with proper medical and surgical treatment. Atypical mycobacteria infections cause little mortality. They can cause morbidity, especially when they are not diagnosed and not treated effectively. Often times, cutaneous atypical mycobacteria infection can resolve on its own without intervention. In children, cervical lymphadenitis caused by atypical mycobacteria can result in facial nerve injury, and the incidence of hypertrophic scarring varies among the different treatments.

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Patient Education

Patients should avoid exposure to atypical mycobacteria by contaminated injections or materials.

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