Berloque Dermatitis Medication

Updated: Mar 04, 2016
  • Author: Ali Alikhan, MD; Chief Editor: William D James, MD  more...
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Medication

Medication Summary

Medical therapy is largely unnecessary for the treatment of berloque dermatitis, except in cases with persistent hyperpigmentation. In these cases, skin-bleaching agents (eg, hydroquinone) are the mainstays of therapy.

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Depigmenting agents

Class Summary

Skin bleaching agents are indicated for the gradual depigmentation of hyperpigmented skin conditions.

Hydroquinone (Claripel cream with sunscreens)

Hydroquinone produces reversible depigmentation of the skin by inhibiting enzymatic oxidation of tyrosine to 3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-alanine (dopa)) and suppression of other melanocyte metabolic processes. Exposure to sunlight or ultraviolet light causes repigmentation, which may be prevented by the broad-spectrum sunscreen agents contained in this product.

Hydroquinone (Eldopaque-Forte, Solaquin Forte, Lustra)

Hydroquinone is indicated for the gradual bleaching of hyperpigmented skin conditions such as chloasma, melasma, freckles, senile lentigines, and other unwanted areas of melanin hyperpigmentation. It is also is used to reduce hyperpigmentation caused by photosensitization associated with inflammation or with the use of certain perfumes (berloque dermatitis).

Topical application of hydroquinone produces a reversible depigmentation of the skin by inhibition of the enzymatic oxidation of tyrosine to 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (dopa) and suppression of other melanocyte metabolic processes. Depigmentation may take 1-4 months to occur while existing melanin is sloughed off and excretion of new melanin is increased by hydroquinone. Exposure to sunlight or ultraviolet light will cause repigmentation, which may be prevented by broad-spectrum sunscreen agents.

Hydroquinone is available topically, in strengths of 2-4%, in the form of a cream, lotion, solution, powder, or gel.

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