Cerebellar Hemorrhage Follow-up

Updated: Dec 05, 2016
  • Author: Sonal Mehta, MD; Chief Editor: Helmi L Lutsep, MD  more...
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Follow-up

Further Outpatient Care

Physical and occupational therapy may be useful in many patients.

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Further Inpatient Care

Ideally, admit patients to the care of critical care physicians with expertise in managing intracranial hemorrhages.

Careful monitoring for level of consciousness, vital signs, and ICP is needed for some patients.

The risk of sudden deterioration is high and mandates the attention that is available in an intensive care unit.

If immediate surgical intervention is deferred, a deteriorating clinical course may necessitate surgery at a later time.

  • Posterior fossa craniotomy and evacuation of the hemorrhage may be necessary for patients with worsening clinical condition.
  • If surgical therapy is prompt, some comatose patients still may have a good clinical outcome.

Physical and occupational therapy may be useful in patients who are in stable condition.

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Transfer

For facilities without neurosurgical care for hemorrhage management, transfer to a specialized center should occur after stabilization.

  • Transfer should occur only after discussion with an accepting physician.
  • Transfer personnel should be skilled in critical care management.
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Complications

Progression of the hemorrhage with brainstem compression and/or destruction is the most serious complication.

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Prognosis

Prognosis is largely related to the size and location of the hemorrhage and the patient's clinical condition at the time of clinical presentation.

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Patient Education

For patient education resources, see the Stroke Center, as well as Stroke.

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