Spinal Cord Hemorrhage Follow-up

Updated: Mar 11, 2014
  • Author: Richard M Zweifler, MD; Chief Editor: Helmi L Lutsep, MD  more...
  • Print
Follow-up

Further Outpatient Care

After the patient is discharged from inpatient care, outpatient therapies continue. Medical treatments are frequently necessary for the late complications of spinal cord hemorrhage, especially spasticity, pain, and neurogenic bladder.

Next:

Further Inpatient Care

Once the patient with spinal cord hemorrhage has been treated, whether medically, via interventional radiology, or surgery, rehabilitation can begin. Usually this is accomplished in an inpatient rehabilitation setting.

Previous
Next:

Inpatient & Outpatient Medications

See the list below:

  • Spasticity secondary to spinal cord hemorrhage is treated in similar ways to spasticity secondary to spinal cord injury or multiple sclerosis. Drugs include baclofen, tizanidine, and diazepam.
  • Pain following spinal cord hemorrhage, other than pain directly secondary to spasticity, is treated similarly to neuropathic pain syndromes such as those in multiple sclerosis. Drugs include gabapentin, amitriptyline, and carbamazepine.
  • Bladder complications of spinal cord hemorrhage are similar to those of spinal cord injury or multiple sclerosis. Consultation with a urologist may be necessary. Drug therapy with anticholinergic agents may be beneficial for reflex uninhibited bladder (ie, failure to store), and intermittent self-catheterization is essential in patients with inability to void (ie, failure to empty).
Previous
Next:

Deterrence/Prevention

Avoid lumbar puncture in patients with hematologic disorders or in those treated with prescribed anticoagulants.

Previous
Next:

Prognosis

Prognosis varies but generally is correlated with severity of deficit. A more favorable outcome is seen in patients receiving prompt diagnosis and surgical intervention.

Previous