Acquired Epileptic Aphasia Medication

Updated: Oct 19, 2017
  • Author: Eli S Neiman, DO, FACN; Chief Editor: Amy Kao, MD  more...
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Medication

Medication Summary

No drug of choice is known for acquired epileptic aphasia (AEA), but corticosteroids and adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH) have become popular despite a lack of controlled trials. One should not treat based on the following information but should reference the most up-to-date literature.

The data presented below, including dosages, are based on how corticosteroids and ACTH have often been prescribed for patients with acquired epileptic aphasia but may be subject to change.

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Corticosteroids

Class Summary

The mechanism of action of immunosuppressant-mediated improvement in acquired epileptic aphasia (AEA) is unknown.

Prednisone

Prednisone is effective in improving aphasia in a few reports. Early treatment may be better than late treatment (data from uncontrolled trials).

Corticotropin (H.P. Acthar)

Corticotropin is effective in improving aphasia (few reports); early treatment may be better than late treatment (data from uncontrolled trials).

Prednisolone (Millipred, Orapred ODT, Veripred, Prelone)

Prednisolone is effective in improving aphasia in a few reports. Early treatment may be better than late treatment (data from uncontrolled trials).

Methylprednisolone (Solu-Medrol)

Pulse intravenous (IV) methylprednisolone therapy has been used to induce remission in acquired epileptic aphasia.

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