Peripheral Anterior Synechia Follow-up

Updated: Jul 26, 2016
  • Author: Andrew J Tatham, MBChB, FRCOphth, FRCSEd, FEBO; Chief Editor: Hampton Roy, Sr, MD  more...
  • Print
Follow-up

Further Outpatient Care

Further care depends on the disease process that leads to peripheral anterior synechiae (PAS) formation.

Next:

Deterrence/Prevention

Appropriate and timely management of the disease processes that leads to peripheral anterior synechiae almost certainly will preclude peripheral anterior synechiae formation. This is the most important aspect of peripheral anterior synechiae management, because once peripheral anterior synechia has formed, treatment is focused on sequelae of peripheral anterior synechiae (ie, intraocular pressure) rather than peripheral anterior synechiae itself.

Previous
Next:

Complications

Complications include elevated intraocular pressure leading to ocular pain, decreased visual acuity, and glaucomatous optic neuropathy with visual loss.

Previous
Next:

Prognosis

See the list below:

  • Peripheral anterior synechiae should be treated within 6 months of formation if the trabecular meshwork is to regain normal function. Beyond this, the trabecular meshwork will have incurred permanent damage.

  • Ultimately, prognosis depends on the adequacy of management of the etiologic process that leads to peripheral anterior synechiae formation.

  • Eyes with 360-degree peripheral anterior synechiae may not be treated adequately with medications and, thus, require a glaucoma filtering procedure.

Previous
Next:

Patient Education

Patient education depends on the disease process that leads to peripheral anterior synechiae formation.

Previous