Toxic Anterior Segment Syndrome (TASS) Medication

Updated: May 03, 2017
  • Author: Jean Deschênes, MD, FRCSC; Chief Editor: Hampton Roy, Sr, MD  more...
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Medication

Medication Summary

Medical therapy for toxic anterior segment syndrome (TASS) includes corticosteroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

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Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs

Class Summary

NSAIDs inhibit enzyme cyclooxygenase and also can be used in the prevention of cystoid macular edema (CME). NSAIDs are administered topically, usually for 3-4 months.

Nepafenac ophthalmic (Nevanac)

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory prodrug for ophthalmic use. Following administration, converted by ocular tissue hydrolases to amfenac, an NSAID. Inhibits prostaglandin H synthase (cyclooxygenase), an enzyme required for prostaglandin production. Indicated for treatment of pain and inflammation associated with cataract surgery.

Diclofenac ophthalmic (Voltaren)

Inhibits prostaglandin synthesis by decreasing activity of enzyme cyclooxygenase, which, in turn, decreases formation of prostaglandin precursors. Commonly used in the treatment of CME and postoperative inflammation in patients who have undergone cataract extraction.

Ketorolac ophthalmic (Acular)

For treatment of CME and postoperative inflammation in patients who have undergone cataract extraction. Inhibits prostaglandin synthesis by decreasing activity of the enzyme, cyclooxygenase, which results in decreased formation of prostaglandin precursors, which, in turn, results in reduced inflammation.

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Topical Steroids

Class Summary

These agents decrease inflammation. Corticosteroid treatment is often initiated only after consultation with an ophthalmologist.

Prednisolone acetate 1% (Pred Forte, Omnipred Plus)

Strongest steroid of its group and best choice for uveitis. Decreases inflammation by suppressing migration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes and reversing increased capillary permeability.

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