Ocular Rosacea Follow-up

Updated: Apr 07, 2017
  • Author: Bhairavi Kharod-Dholakia, MD; Chief Editor: Hampton Roy, Sr, MD  more...
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Follow-up

Further Outpatient Care

Rosacea is a chronic condition, and long-term management is necessary to control this disease.

Dermatology and ophthalmology visits may be necessary, and they could initially be frequent to gain control over the symptoms or to protect an endangered cornea.

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Further Inpatient Care

Inpatient care is rarely necessary, except in some cases of corneal perforations or severe secondary corneal infections.

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Inpatient & Outpatient Medications

See the list below:

  • Lid hygiene
  • Artificial tears
  • Oral antibiotics - Doxycycline, tetracycline, clarithromycin, or metronidazole
  • Erythromycin ointment
  • Topical metronidazole
  • Topical steroids
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Deterrence/Prevention

Patients should avoid trigger foods and situations.

For some patients, avoidance of sunlight can minimize flare-ups.

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Complications

Complications include corneal vascularization, ulceration, perforations, secondary bacterial infections, and, ultimately, decreased vision.

Eyes undergoing penetrating keratoplasty are more likely to experience graft rejection than eyes without rosacea because of the increased inflammatory response and the relatively increased corneal vasculature.

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Prognosis

Rosacea can be controlled symptomatically but is generally a chronic condition, which requires long-term, follow-up care.

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Patient Education

Informing patients of the chronic, relapsing nature of rosacea is important so that patient expectation matches available therapy and patient follow-up care is maximized.

Ophthalmologists may underdiagnose rosacea because of a lack of familiarity with the dermatologic manifestations of the disease.

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