Phacolytic Glaucoma Follow-up

Updated: Apr 06, 2017
  • Author: Kayoung Yi, MD, PhD; Chief Editor: Inci Irak Dersu, MD, MPH  more...
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Follow-up

Further Outpatient Care

In most cases, IOP begins to rapidly normalize following cataract extraction, allowing discontinuation of ocular medications. A minority of patients will have persistent elevation of IOP requiring long-term medical therapy or filtering surgery to control the glaucoma.

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Further Inpatient Care

Inpatient care is not usually necessary for phacolytic glaucoma unless the patient is briefly hospitalized following emergency cataract extraction.

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Deterrence/Prevention

Removal of mature or hypermature cataracts may be preventive.

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Complications

Potential complications of phacolytic glaucoma include the following:

  • Loss of vision from uncontrolled glaucoma and/or persistent corneal edema

  • Surgical complications, including suprachoroidal hemorrhage, capsular rupture with loss of lens material into the posterior segment, corneal injury, and vitreous prolapse

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Prognosis

Prognosis is excellent, with most patients experiencing marked improvement in vision following cataract extraction; however, delayed treatment may cause a poor outcome.

Patients with phacolytic glaucoma (PG) may have a worse prognosis than patients with phacomorphic glaucoma.

In most cases, treatment to lower intraocular pressure can be discontinued after cataract extraction. A minority of patients who have persistent intraocular pressure elevation may need long-term medical therapy or a filtering surgery to control intraocular pressure.

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Patient Education

Seek a comprehensive eye examination when progressive vision loss is first noted.

For excellent patient education resources, visit eMedicineHealth's Eye and Vision Center. Also, see eMedicineHealth's patient education articles Glaucoma Overview, Glaucoma FAQs, and Glaucoma Medications.

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