Drug-Induced Glaucoma Follow-up

Updated: Apr 21, 2017
  • Author: Michael D Greenwood, MD; Chief Editor: Hampton Roy, Sr, MD  more...
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Follow-up

Further Outpatient Care

Open angle

It is recommended that all patients who use chronic corticosteroid medications in any capacity should have a full ophthalmologic evaluation.

Patients on topical corticosteroid therapy should receive follow-up care at regular intervals by an ophthalmologist to monitor their ocular condition and IOP. Steroid-induced IOP elevation typically occurs within 2-6 weeks of beginning steroid therapy.

Upon stopping corticosteroids, the IOP usually normalizes in a few weeks to months. For patients on medical therapy alone, the interval of follow-up care is determined by the extent of the IOP elevation and the degree of optic nerve and visual field damage.

Patients who have had surgical intervention should have follow-up care consistent with routine postoperative care for the appropriate procedure.

Closed angle

It is recommended that people older than the 40 years should have routine eye examinations to screen for various conditions. One of these conditions should be the presence of narrow anterior chamber angles.

Treat the same as primary acute angle-closure glaucoma.

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Inpatient & Outpatient Medications

See Medication.

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Deterrence/Prevention

Drugs that have the potential of inducing glaucoma should only be used if truly indicated.

If drugs must be used, IOP should be monitored closely.

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Complications

Untreated glaucoma can lead to permanent visual damage and blindness.

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Prognosis

A favorable outlook exists if IOP is controlled.

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Patient Education

It is recommended that all patients who use chronic corticosteroid medications in any capacity should have a full ophthalmologic evaluation.

For excellent patient education resources, visit eMedicineHealth's Eye and Vision Center. Also, see eMedicineHealth's patient education articles Glaucoma Overview, Glaucoma FAQs, Glaucoma Medications, and Angle Recession Glaucoma.

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