Iris Leiomyoma Clinical Presentation

Updated: Feb 18, 2019
  • Author: Manolette R Roque, MD, MBA, FPAO; Chief Editor: Hampton Roy, Sr, MD  more...
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Presentation

History

This tumor is usually a benign iris mass that remains clinically stationary for many years. See Physical.

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Physical

Lenticular astigmatism may be a subtle sign of an anterior segment tumor, ie, iris leiomyoma. [3]

Leiomyoma of the iris is a localized, flat to slightly elevated mass, often at the region of the sphincter muscle. It is found less commonly in the iris periphery and the anterior chamber angle.

Clinically, the tumor appears nonpigmented (sometimes lightly pigmented), transparent (grayish white to pink colored), and vascular.

Ectropion iridis is a common finding in the area of the tumor.

Leiomyoma of the iris may be difficult to differentiate from an amelanotic iris melanoma.

These tumors can be clinically stationary for many years.

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Causes

The cause of leiomyoma of the iris is unknown. See Pathophysiology.

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Complications

Continued tumor growth may cause secondary glaucoma.

When the mass reaches the visual axis, a decrease in vision may occur.

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