Enophthalmos Follow-up

Updated: Sep 30, 2014
  • Author: Charles NS Soparkar, MD, PhD; Chief Editor: Hampton Roy, Sr, MD  more...
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Follow-up

Further Outpatient Care

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  • This depends on the etiology of enophthalmos.
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Further Inpatient Care

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  • Follow-up depends on the etiology of enophthalmos.
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Complications

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  • Long-standing enophthalmos, especially associated with very extensive orbital trauma, may be associated with severe orbital scarring, and correction can be very difficult or impossible.
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Prognosis

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  • Most causes of enophthalmos are treatable, and surgical correction is most frequently excellent following outpatient surgery.
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Patient Education

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  • Perhaps the single most important advice to give a patient until the workup of suspected new-onset enophthalmos has been completed is not to blow their nose and to sneeze with their mouth open.
    • One of the most common causes of enophthalmos is orbital fracture. Barometric changes in the nasopharynx (wind velocity may exceed 200 mph during a sneeze) can force air into the orbit. The loose orbital fat may then fall back into place covering the bone defect, acting as a ball valve, trapping the air, and creating an acute orbital compartment syndrome with blinding potential.
    • Other causes of bone loss between the orbit and the sinuses (most notably varix and silent sinus syndrome) also may be affected by dramatic barometric pressure changes.
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