Branch Retinal Artery Occlusion (BRAO) Treatment & Management

Updated: Sep 18, 2018
  • Author: Rishabh C Date, MD; Chief Editor: Hampton Roy, Sr, MD  more...
  • Print
Treatment

Medical Care

Considering the increased rate of mortality, patients with branch retinal artery occlusion (BRAO) should receive a full medical workup with special attention to the cerebrovascular and cardiovascular system. Depending on the findings, carotid endarterectomy or anticoagulation may be indicated. Laboratory workup for coagulopathies should also be performed if no embolic source is found.

Next:

Surgical Care

Surgical embolus excision has been described in a few case reports, with the authors reporting good visual outcome and safety. [32, 33] Given the natural history of frequent spontaneous visual improvement and generally good visual outcome in untreated BRAO, further investigation with a randomized controlled trial is likely needed to validate surgical embolus excision as a treatment option in BRAO.

Previous
Next:

Consultations

Refer to an internist for complete systemic workup.

Previous
Next:

Prevention

Controlling blood pressure, cholesterol, and diabetes can greatly reduce the risk of atherosclerotic disease.

Smoking cessation can also lower the risk of stroke.

Previous
Next:

Long-Term Monitoring

Patients should initially be evaluated every 3-6 months to monitor progression.

Ocular neovascularization after BRAO is rare. If neovascularization occurs, panretinal photocoagulation should be performed.

Previous