Intraocular Foreign Body (IOFB) Follow-up

Updated: May 18, 2017
  • Author: Ferenc Kuhn, MD, PhD; Chief Editor: Inci Irak Dersu, MD, MPH  more...
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Follow-up

Further Outpatient Care

Follow-up visits are necessary for at least 4 months to determine whether proliferative vitreoretinopathy has occurred. Rehabilitation service may be necessary if permanent visual impairment is present.

If retinal folds, radiating from a retinal impact site, develop and interfere with vision by reaching into the macula—and even seemingly inconspicuous folds can cause severe visual disturbance—late chorioretinectomy should be considered. [20]

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Further Inpatient Care

Unless serious complications are present, the patient can be discharged shortly after surgery.

Educate the patient about the potential of both early complications (eg, intraocular pressure elevation) and late complications (eg, scarring).

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Inpatient & Outpatient Medications

Topical antibiotics and corticosteroids in the early postoperative period are indicated.

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Deterrence/Prevention

Safety eyewear made of polycarbonate (3 mm in thickness) virtually eliminates the risk of intraocular foreign bodies (IOFBs).

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Complications

Endophthalmitis, corneal scarring, elevated intraocular pressure, cataract, retinal detachment, proliferative vitreoretinopathy, and metallosis (eg, chalcosis, siderosis) are possible complications. [21]

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Prognosis

The prognosis is generally relatively good. Over one half of eyes with IOFB injury regain/retain reading vision.

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Patient Education

Eye protection when partaking in risky activities (eg, hammering, mowing the lawn) is strongly recommended. [22]

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